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I've seen one shooter do large scale pano's and he simply had it hand held and then spent a lot of time bringing the images in with PS. He's apparently been doing these for years this way!

I really don't know why more shooters don't try this!

 

Andrzej - I'd love to see what you could do on a colourful reef! As Matthew has stated the lighting is the big issue!

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Thanks for the tips. Im planning on doing alot of panoramics on the colorado river next week, then hope to practice in my pool and try uw in my oct trip to raja ampat.

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Are there any special techniques to control lighting on a large scene when its very deep? I was a diving recently with a TV crew (History Channel from the US) and had a chance to take some photos to work out some panorama exercises which seems to have led me to more questions. The ship in question is about 140 deep and the light is very dim with a fairly strong current and silt flow moving across it. Yesterday when I took these 3 photos to make this panorama it was also overcast with lightning splitting the sky and rain. I intend to be much closer to the ship when I actually begin the panorama/mapping project but for these shots I was avoiding the film crew and had to stay high. The 3 divers in the photo were being filmed from slightly behind and overhead for the TV show.

 

1) Any light suggestions?

2) Any perspective suggestions?

3) Any particular lens suggestions? (these were taken with an 18mm at 115 feet or so)

4) Anything else I forgot to ask about?

 

2473963330100390769S600x600Q85.jpg

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I made these from about 4-5 shots taken with 10.5mm (assembled with Double Take).

 

post-3809-1213258014_thumb.jpg

 

post-3809-1213258045_thumb.jpg

 

Do I understand that these were photographed with a fisheye lens and then assembled? How did you deal with the distortion if so?

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Do I understand that these were photographed with a fisheye lens and then assembled? How did you deal with the distortion if so?

 

Took the Tokina 10-17FE lens and shot 5 frames with minimal overlap and used PS Elements to stitch these together. I am not sure what the color differences are between some of the frames. Is there software to smooth out the color and or exposure differences?

 

2101515540100390769S600x600Q85.jpg

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Do I understand that these were photographed with a fisheye lens and then assembled? How did you deal with the distortion if so?

 

That is right, a fisheye. I used Double Take to stitch it together. It takes care of distortions and smooths transitions between frames semi-automatically.

It is really simple to use.

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Took the Tokina 10-17FE lens and shot 5 frames with minimal overlap and used PS Elements to stitch these together. I am not sure what the color differences are between some of the frames. Is there software to smooth out the color and or exposure differences?

Were you shooting fully manual & lock in a white balance prior to shooting? Any control set to auto can cause these drastic differences from frame to frame. If you are shooting RAW, then WB isn't a big deal but if you are shooting jpegs then you have to set WB in camera.

You may be able to reduce the color differences in PS, but it will be a time consuming process.

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Many of the programs correct for lens barrel distortion before trying to stitch the photos. I use Autopano pro which used the Panotools library and does a great job.

 

That's why when you stitch the photos each one looks rounded at the top and bottom...

 

Cheers

James

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Anyone have any input on which application is best; Autopano Pro, Double Take, Panorama Factory or even just Photoshop CS3?

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Anyone have any input on which application is best; Autopano Pro, Double Take, Panorama Factory or even just Photoshop CS3?

Been using Arcsoft Panorama Maker 4 for about 1 year. Simple interface, doesn't ask a lot of questions and seems to get the job done fairly well assuming you have shot the sequence correctly. I've done many successful hand-held panos with the program and it usually handles them well. It opens TIFF files which is important to me. I don't know what the others do but have run across programs that will only open Jpegs... then save to TIFF (?????)

I'm sure the other programs being mentioned are good. This program was recommended by a guy giving a talk at last years Photoshop World conference on making panoramas. That was recommendation enough for me.

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Very interesting thread............ Since 1 month, I'm trying to make QTVR underwater: I really LOVE THEm!!!!

making underwater panorama isnt as hard as it seems. But there is a lot of editing work after the dive!!!! But making 360x180 panorama is a torture!!!

 

Here is some samples (Im working on the technique so I hope next panoramas would be better)

 

Inside the Wreck This one was really hard to make.....

 

3 m stop this one too was very difficult to stich: software cant find controls points to stiche because there is only blue.....

 

Mediterranean landscape Dont know why music loop is playing too fast on my browser

 

 

I tried hotspots too....... but need to work again on it......

0

Montremian landscape

 

 

I love this one..... really relaxing ambient and good memories

Montremian landscape cylindric

 

 

Hop you enjoyed them..... I cant stop myself playing with my QTVR....its so fun......

Edited by Merlinos

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For those that have done large scale panoramics what lens did you use? I am thinking that the 12-24mm Nikon would be the best but I dont have one to practice with. Any help would be appreciated!

 

"Do underwater as you would do on the surface" - a nice biblical-sounding quote that works for panos... :bananashark:

As others have mentioned, with panos, especially hand-held, you may get better results with longer focal lengths ("normal"ish, even slight tele) and more shots with lots of overlap (i.e. 30-50%). There are lots of good online resources on top-side tips and techniques that will directly apply to uw as well, and so I'd start there... Having said that, lens choice also depends on subject, lighting, movement in frame and lots of other stuff. Choppy water being a good example, too many/detailed pics gets hard to merge nicely so there you might go with fewer but wider shots.

For processing, I'm using CS3 on Vista which is fine to a point, but I am having trouble with hard crashes on large 100Mb+ merges despite 1.5Gb RAM allocation and lots of scratch disk space etc. Any MS/CS3 config experts here that could advise via PM? I've tried everything from other online resources, and may even try adobe support when I feel the need for more computer-related mind-numbing :lol:

I look forward to reading/seeing a lot more on this thread!

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Has anyone tried any underwater tripod, or other stabilizing device?

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Has anyone tried any underwater tripod, or other stabilizing device?

Yes. My advice would be to go to your local camera store and buy the least expensive aluminum travel tripod you can find. (You could pay $300 for an underwater tripod, or $40 for a cheapie and throw them out when they fall apart). If your housing doesn't have a tripod mount, any machine shop can make an aluminum bracket which you can mount to the handle screws, or other attachment points on your housing.

 

Personally, I have found that using your viewfinder as a level works fairly well underwater instead of a tripod. Don't go too wide, shoot manual mode and after averaging your scene, don't touch the settings or focus between shots, shoot vertical and expect to crop a good deal from all sides, so overshoot the intended final scene by 20-30%.

 

Now, the real trick is even lighting...

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Thanks, sounds like a major photoshop job, but thats ok. I may try it in the north channel islands next month, altho it will be tough in my drysuit.

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the only way I found to stitch the pictures together for these wrecks was manual mode with photoshop – by lighting problems, it allows to change luminosity for each picture which help a lot for a global homogeneity!

 

Claude

 

Rubis_V5.jpg

 

Sunset_Wreck_v4.jpg

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the only way I found to stitch the pictures together for these wrecks was manual mode with photoshop – by lighting problems, it allows to change luminosity for each picture which help a lot for a global homogeneity!

 

Claude

 

Rubis_V5.jpg

 

Sunset_Wreck_v4.jpg

 

Claude send me your pictures from Rubis..... i will try to stich them with stiching software (some are very powerful)

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Very interesting thread............ Since 1 month, I'm trying to make QTVR underwater: I really LOVE THEm!!!!

making underwater panorama isnt as hard as it seems. But there is a lot of editing work after the dive!!!! But making 360x180 panorama is a torture!!!

 

Here is some samples (Im working on the technique so I hope next panoramas would be better)

 

Inside the Wreck This one was really hard to make.....

 

3 m stop this one too was very difficult to stich: software cant find controls points to stiche because there is only blue.....

 

Mediterranean landscape Dont know why music loop is playing too fast on my browser

 

 

I tried hotspots too....... but need to work again on it......

0

Montremian landscape

 

 

I love this one..... really relaxing ambient and good memories

Montremian landscape cylindric

 

 

Hop you enjoyed them..... I cant stop myself playing with my QTVR....its so fun......

This is nice. What software tools here..Quicktime Pro and?

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Anyone have any input on which application is best; Autopano Pro, Double Take, Panorama Factory or even just Photoshop CS3?

 

I use Panavue Image Assembler and have been well satisfied with it.

 

It adjusts exposure and does a really nice job blending. Here are a couple of handheld ones that I did. Click the image to see larger ones.

 

Sunset in Boynton Beach Inlet:

 

large.jpg

 

Here's one of an orchestra that is particularly difficult because of movement. Panavue did a great job:

large.jpg

 

-- Martin

http://www.pbase.com/mschiff

Edited by mschiff

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Claude send me your pictures from Rubis..... i will try to stich them with stiching software (some are very powerful)

I've tried a lot of them... as soon there are no real distinct repairs (like for the sub), they are lost in their work!

Stitching 3 pictures together is not the same as stitching 30...

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This is my first large scale panoramic, the ship is just over 100meters long at a depth of 43 meters. I think I finally found the exposure trick to make sure each frame looked fairly similar but I also lucked out that the visiblity remained fairly constant for the photos. There are three divers with doubles near the stern if you can find them that will give you an idea of the scale.

2602442100100390769S600x600Q85.jpg

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WOW I'm ammazed at both the sub and the wreck, great shots (and some real PS skill).

 

I assume that they have been shot by swiming along the site not from a fixed point such as a tripod ?

(Please correct me if I'm wrong.)

 

How many individual photos went into them ? Is it possible to show an unblended shot such as with a bright rectangle around each photo or post one of the single images to get some idea of the scale and amount of stiching done.

 

Again, WOW, I'm amazed. Going to go for a splash on Saturday and try and do what I'm sure will be a very poor copy.

 

Cheers,

Richard B.

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This was done while kneeling on the sand at 40 meters or so and shooting offhand.

2321720460100390769S600x600Q85.jpg

 

 

Now thats nice !!!!

 

Dive safe

 

DeanB

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I shoot big panorams topside all the time - stitching up to 20 shots together (even more for HDR panos). Photoshop can do it but it is cumbersome compared to dedicated programs. The best one I have used is RealViz Stitcher Pro. I am about to try a new one called Autopano that is getting rave reviews from panoramic photographers I know.

 

Both Stitcher Pro and Autopano do automatic color adjustment so you do not have to worry about the exposure. They also do the alignment and other hard parts.

 

I am going to try do some reef panoramics my next dive trip, but that will not be for several months.

 

Note that there a couple key points in taking panoramics:

 

- You want to keep the camera level. One way to do this is to hang a string with a weight (plumb bob) from the camera - that gives you a virtual visual reference to help keep the camera at 90 degrees to the string. I have done this topside, but not done it underwater yet.

 

- Another trick for taking good handheld panorama is to get a grid viewfinder screen for your camera (Nikon, Canon and most other cameras have them). This gives you a visual reference for lining up the panorama shots. I took panoramas of glaciers in Greenland from a boat handheld and they came out great.

 

- Allow about 25% overlap between shots. This makes it much easier to stitch. This is also another reason for the grid screen.

 

- The best resolution comes if you shoot with the camera in PORTRAIT mode, NOT LANDSCAPE. That puts more pixels along the short edge of the panorama. It means you must take more shots, but that is relatively easy. This also affects your lens choice - you may not need a very wide lens.

 

There are a bunch of good web sites on panoramic photography - do a search and you'll find lots of information. A lot of it will mention finding the "nodal point" of the lens. That is NOT required unless you are doing super critical work very close to the lens, AND you have a tripod. So you can ignore that for UW use.

Edited by nathanm

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