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oskar

DX-1G - data and white balance?

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I really don't like the manual, I don't think it covers what you want to know in functionality and data. I guess it is not specific for Ricoh, but is the same for all consumer cameras. But still..

 

There is a limit in exposure time for each mode, anyone found out what these are for all modes? I am diving with a tripod, so i want the camera to go into several seconds exposure if needed.

 

I also have an issue with WB that someone may be able to help?

 

First, in order to manually set the white balance, I believe it is not enought to point to a neutral object and lock, you must fill the image with the neutral colour. Anyone that have made the same observation?

 

Second, what happens when you then shoot raw? The camera saves DNG+JPG. I did this yesterday, and got a nice JPG. However, the contrast could be better, so I want to use the DNG an generate a new JPG from it. The white balance in the DNG (the DNG format must support storing a WB, right?) is completely different from the JPG's white balance. Am I correct in assuming that the camera never sves the manual WP in the DNG? This is a bug to me. Of course I want to use my measured WB in the post processing of my DNG!

 

Have you any other workarounds? Is it an easy way to guess the WB from the JPG? I can only think of actually taking one DNG picture of the WB-slate first in order to get a WB adjustment in Lightroom, then i manually apply the same values to the following photos.

 

But how do I go about with yesterday's photos?

 

 

Cheers

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Regarding your RAW and WB question, the RAW format doesn't stores the WB settings of the camera, that is the main idea of shooting RAW.

You have to process your DNG (RAW) picture in your computer with some software like RAWtherapy (free) or Photoshop (not free), there are many options you can find in the web.

In your computer you can add WB, and a lot of other settings to your RAW picture in order to get what you want.

I'm just starting using RAW and I hope not to be so wrong. :D

Edited by lrossel

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lrossel is correct. One of the benefits with using RAW is that you can change the WB after the fact and not lose any quality. That said, I find that opening a RAW file in most editors will automatically load the WB that the camera had set at the time of taking the photo - this should be the same WB that was used to create the JPG. I know photoshop/adobe camera raw does this, and I seem to remember lightroom doing this as well. Do you have lightroom set to auto tune photos in any way? If so, it might be adjusting WB.

 

Regarding setting the white balance, yes, you need to use a gray or white object to set WB to. I'm lazy - I just find a white object in the scene after when editing the photo in Adobe Camera RAW, then set the WB reading off of that.

 

Regarding time limits for exposure, I haven't noticed that, but I primarily am using A. What modes are you finding that limit?

Edited by cninsd

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Hmm, interesting, but I think it is wrong.

 

It would be good if someone with DNG knowledge could confirm this:

 

DNG does in fact store WB settings. As it is a raw format, one can generate different images using other WB settings, but the original setting is in fact stored in the DNG. (Other RAW formats may very well not store the WB setting, i don't know)

 

However, there are other settings that the camera engine uses for the image generation that are not stored with the image. For example "colour saturation", i fiddled with this setting in Lightroom, and noticed that the a very low saturation generated a similar image to the camera's JPG.

 

 

Otherwise I have used P, A and M. With P I noticed afterwards that the camera seldom went over 1s, but i did not try to change it. I'll try this out later. With M I got really nice results when increasing exposure to 15s and very small aperture. It removes the importance of the shake I generate when i pushed the trigger.

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DNG does in fact store WB settings. As it is a raw format, one can generate different images using other WB settings, but the original setting is in fact stored in the DNG. (Other RAW formats may very well not store the WB setting, i don't know)

 

However, there are other settings that the camera engine uses for the image generation that are not stored with the image. For example "colour saturation", i fiddled with this setting in Lightroom, and noticed that the a very low saturation generated a similar image to the camera's JPG.

 

Hi oskar,

 

Correct, there is a WB setting in DNG (and in other RAW formats like CR2). My understanding is that the initial WB setting in the DNG is set by the camera when it takes the photo. As I said before, in my experience, the WB on the JPG is the same as the WB on the DNG file when I load it with ACR.

 

As you said, not all settings are transferred to the DNG. As far as I know the sliders on the DX-1G for in-camera sharpening, saturation, and contrast are only applied to the JPG files, and not the DNG files. Once you make adjustments to the DNG in a program like ACR, it stores those development settings with the file (or in the case of CR2, a sidecar file).

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