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danielstassen

IKELITE DS125 with 60mm lens

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Hi everybody,

 

I just bought an Ikelite DS125 which I am gonna use with a 60mm lens for macro shots. I am wondering if one strobe is enough to get good results, or should I opt for a second one?

 

Cheers

 

Daniel

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Hi everybody,

 

I just bought an Ikelite DS125 which I am gonna use with a 60mm lens for macro shots. I am wondering if one strobe is enough to get good results, or should I opt for a second one?

 

Cheers

 

Daniel

 

The more light the better in my book. I have the same lens and strobes. I've been very happy with all of them so far. I try to use the strobes at different angles/power settings for subtle shadows..

One strobe will work as well, by for my 2 cents get 2.

 

ed

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I'm a firm believer in two strobes. Annoying shadows are hard to avoid with one strobe. You have to aim a single strobe much better than than two, i.e. two strobes allow a much greater margin of error for strobe aim.

 

It's not the amount of light, but the direction and balance.

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Hi everybody,

 

I just bought an Ikelite DS125 which I am gonna use with a 60mm lens for macro shots. I am wondering if one strobe is enough to get good results, or should I opt for a second one?

 

Cheers

 

Daniel

If you are just starting out, then one strobe is easier to learn with. One strobe will work just fine most of the time, but two are better. I sometimes only use a single strobe if I am doing a beach dive and want to reduce clutter. It's easy to add a second strobe later on when you are ready for it.

 

Dave

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If you are just starting out, then one strobe is easier to learn with. One strobe will work just fine most of the time, but two are better. I sometimes only use a single strobe if I am doing a beach dive and want to reduce clutter. It's easy to add a second strobe later on when you are ready for it.

 

Dave

 

So you reckon I can get great results only with one strobe (for macro)?

 

Cheers

 

Daniel

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So you reckon I can get great results only with one strobe (for macro)?

 

Cheers

 

Daniel

Sure you can.

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One strobe is fine, many people buy 2 strobes and forget that you can get equally pleasing results with just one. The image often seems more natural with just one source of light, specifically coming from above.

 

Our brains are used to seeing shadow coming from the sun, so we expect to see shadow below the subject - if that makes sense.

 

Shadow is just as important in making an image as light. One of my strobe cables has an intermittent break in it, so i get to use one strobe only from time to time during a dive ;)

 

In the future get a second one if you fancy it, but 2 strobes are not a necessity

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Hi everybody,

 

I just bought an Ikelite DS125 which I am gonna use with a 60mm lens for macro shots. I am wondering if one strobe is enough to get good results, or should I opt for a second one?

 

Cheers

 

Daniel

 

Daniel

 

I would stick with one strobe if you are just going to concentrate on macro for the time being. I would get another Ike sync cord, just in case.

One strobe is easy to aim and place where you want it.. It gets a little clumsy with two. If you go with two,you have the added cost of the strobe and the new sync cords to go with them.

 

Joe

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Daniel

 

I would stick with one strobe if you are just going to concentrate on macro for the time being. I would get another Ike sync cord, just in case.

One strobe is easy to aim and place where you want it.. It gets a little clumsy with two. If you go with two,you have the added cost of the strobe and the new sync cords to go with them.

 

Joe

 

Joe

 

When you say that you would get another Ike sync cord, just in case, you mean in case it breaks, or?

 

Cheers

 

Daniel

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Joe

 

When you say that you would get another Ike sync cord, just in case, you mean in case it breaks, or?

 

Cheers

 

Daniel

 

Yes.. it seems to be a weak link.. But a also bring 2 cameras.. I am lucky, I use the cameras in my business.

 

Joe

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I'm a firm believer in two strobes. Annoying shadows are hard to avoid with one strobe. You have to aim a single strobe much better than than two, i.e. two strobes allow a much greater margin of error for strobe aim.

 

It's not the amount of light, but the direction and balance.

Seconded! On my last trip I used two YS-90DX strobes for the first time (had used one YS-90 previously). That was with a 90mm, and my experience was very positive for the reasons Scorpio Fish mentions. I hate distracting shadows and half-lit faces, and bought the second to help with that -- but didn't know what to expect, really.

 

I found that I got consistently good results without a lot of fiddling, once I pushed them down a lot and angled them in. I used #2 as slave, so no additional cord, and because I was shooting 90mm macro, with a lot of sameness in distance from subject (close!), I often found I could shoot one setup after another with minimal monkeying. Sure, if I had somethign special or with odd requirements, I moved a strobe, but in many cases I got good shadowless even lighting without much effort.

 

Besides finding good starting results with a fixed setup (and tweaking as desired), I found that at or near full power, with my close distance/90mm, I could use f32 at 100 or 200 ISO. My particular lens (Tamron) truly shuts down to f32, not just 22, so DOF was gained.

 

If I had more powerful strobes, I suppose I would get f/22 or 32 well before full power reached on either, but then there's the advantage of faster recycle time in addition to the greater margin of error. I would find it difficult now to go back to one strobe. Not NECESSARY for macro, but so much easier! And might as well start getting used to with short arms and macro, in preparation for 2 strobes with longer arms and wide angle, I figure.

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So you reckon I can get great results only with one strobe (for macro)?

 

Cheers

 

Daniel

 

You will do fine with Macro and one strobe. Start out with the strobe arm and strobe pulled all the way down almost on top of the housing right in the middle and pointed to a spot 6-12" in front of the lens and slightly back from the edge of the lens port to avoid flare.

 

Shadows, in my opinion, are actually desirable in many cases because they will tend to isolate your subject from the background and make the photo feel more three dimensional. Backscatter BTW, is not generally an issue with macro.

 

Two strobes are great to have, but macro is one of the areas you can certainly get some fantastic shots with one.

 

JP

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Until recently, I have used just one DS125 Strobe. I havent been on a trip yet with two as of yet, but I will be going to Bonaire in November. Im looking forward to it.

All of the images on my website Visit My Website are shot with a single strobe with exception of the pool model images.

All of my macro shots are set up with the strobe directly over sitting on the top center of the housing and angled slightly down over the port to the subject to reduce backscatter. I have attached a shot of an eel as a good macro example. If I would have used a second strobe, I would have set it up with one on both sides about 5 inches apart angled slightly in. Then, it would have been lit on both sides without the shadow on the left. The shot is nice as is but a second strobe would have eliminated the dark side.

Keep in mind though, maybe you would like the image with the dark side better anyway! It kind of adds negative space to the eel and frames him away from the coral head...The beauty is in the eye of the beholder at times.....

 

Cheers,

Chuck

 

 

post-5026-1220287732.jpg

Edited by Chuck Jensen

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