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Paul Kay

Too much technology?

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I started a campaign a bit back to raise funds for Dean to be able to dive in warm water and I can add your new equipment to the campaign as an off-shoot.

 

Right now it is a resounding success and everyone who replied thought it was a great idea**

 

:lol: to the New Year

 

 

** Of course everyone who replied was limited to Dean, but it is still is 100% positive rate.

 

I was starting the ball rolling... Come on everyone who lives near warm water.. you know you'd love to spend time with the 'loveable cheeky chappy' that is ME !!!!!..... Don't be shy

 

Get your hands in your pockets and donate as much of your hard earned (well some of you get it for nothing) cash and i will be there in a flash, giving up my time and cold quarry diving to pleasure your lives.

 

That was a public broadcast on behalf of the ' Dean needs warm-water party'

 

Dive safe

 

Dean( I LOVE YOU ALL)B

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Regardless of how often its brought up, I couldn't agree more with pgk's original post. Sometimes people get soooo wrapped up in the minuscule technical details that they totally lose sight that the technology is not the most important aspect of photography. Its one thing if you can actually SEE the difference between a nit and a nat, but the ironic thing is that some of the most "techy" people carrying the most expensive cameras and housings don't even share their own work with us on a website or a in gallery. Rather than listening to someone brag about the newest gadget they just bought and why its so superior, I'd be much more interested to see what they can do with it.

 

Makes me think of a friend of mine who is a trust fund baby who drives a Ferrari. I just shake my head and wonder what he's compensating for. (OK, that was out of line)

 

I will continue to concentrate my efforts on my shooting technique with whatever camera I have in hand and even more important on photo composition and my search for the image that nobody else has yet to capture. I'm also planing to trade in my back-up happy snappy SP-350 for a G10 because sometimes my stock agencies want what those cameras capture too and they do need higher res and the quality RAW images provide, but my stock buyers could give a fat rat's ass about what kind of camera shot the picture, provided it meets their resolution and quality specs.

 

I'm not saying technology isn't important and I'm not talking about digressing back to the film days (get real). I'm saying SHOW me WHY its making you a better shooter.

 

Bonnie

Edited by underwatercolours

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I know, I am bit late to the party on this one (been party-ing). But I think a big part of issue is that on online forums (fora, sorry Paul) it is a lot easy to debate technical issues based in objectively measureable areas - camera performance etc - rather than more complex and subjective issues such as images (its a lot easier to say someones view on a camera is incorrect rather than their image is useless! And so debates tend to focus around gear because it is just easier to discuss and debate.

 

In my experience on trips and workshops photographers want to talk endlessly about technique and what goes into creating great images, and I find that there is rarely much gear talk. Perhaps because this is also because folks are in the doing phase of this activity, rather than in the sitting and waiting for the next time phase - which people tend to be when on Wetpixel.

 

Alex

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Technological discussions and experimentation allow shooters to explore different techniques in photography. The ability to share such ideas is a great thing. It took one geek to realize that digital sensors needed IR/UV and AA filters. Discussion of that turned into a camera purpose built for astrophotography. Another example that is closer to home is Dr Alex Mustard. He developed magic filters to better his ambient light shooting on reefs. The filter discussion came to experimenting with filters on strobes to match the filter on the camera etc etc. Would someone have done it anyways? Yes, people were doing so with Lee filters before magic filters existed. Did the technical discussions help popularize the technique and build up more ways to use filters? I would think definitely.

 

PS

A quote from James Nachtwey, photojournalist:

"I can only speak for myself, but documentary photography and photojournalism are based on perception, not on technology. It doesn’t matter to me if my pictures are shot on film or digital."

James used the latest Canon 1D series for his work in Iraq. Alex Majoli used several Olympus P&S to shoot the same wars. Majoli joined Magnum the year Nachtwey left to form VII. Nachtwey is also sponsored by Apple and Canon. I'm sure Majoli would be too if he chose to. Point is they both choose equipment based on their needs and shooting styles. Both had to learn about the digital world and how to work within it. The camera is a tool and those who understand their tools well usually know how to use them VERY well. There is such a thing as technical photography.

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I think there is a place for both here. I am not a tech guy. I didnt even own a computer until I got a d70 when it came out. I learn a tremendous amount from the teckie people on this site, and look for the posts to learn. On the other hand we have photo sharing, and posting areas on this site for those more atuned to photo sharing. I hope both continue and coexist

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Perhaps because this is also because folks are in the doing phase of this activity, rather than in the sitting and waiting for the next time phase - which people tend to be when on Wetpixel.

Alex

You got that right Alex, sitting around just kills me, and my bank account. Just gave in today to lustful thoughts and bought the 14-24, boy technology makes it easy.

But I did get out and take photographs for a few hours today even if it was not underwater.

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Just gave in today to lustful thoughts and bought the 14-24, boy technology makes it easy.

 

Did I ever mention that you are my hero? :lol:

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You got that right Alex, sitting around just kills me, and my bank account. Just gave in today to lustful thoughts and bought the 14-24, boy technology makes it easy.

But I did get out and take photographs for a few hours today even if it was not underwater.

 

So are you saying is once married with kids, the most lustful thoughts are about cameras and lenses? How depressing! :lol::)

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So are you saying is once married with kids, the most lustful thoughts are about cameras and lenses? How depressing! :lol::)

Drew, that's about as funny as a fart in a spacesuit, but you are partially right. I do have lots of other lustful thoughts but lenses are the only ones I can go out and buy without worrying about having parts cut off. :(

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Space suits have air filters :)

I was merely worried about married family life... nothing personal meant. :lol: 14-24 with D700 is very nice.

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Space suits have air filters :(

I was merely worried about married family life... nothing personal meant. :) 14-24 with D700 is very nice.

The girlfriend making you worried? :lol:

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You got that right Alex, sitting around just kills me, and my bank account. Just gave in today to lustful thoughts and bought the 14-24, boy technology makes it easy.

But I did get out and take photographs for a few hours today even if it was not underwater.

 

Tsk.....

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I think that one thing that draws me to photography and especially underwater photography, is the fact that you have to BOTH have technical and artistic capabilities - it helps to be "whole brained", rather than "left or right" brained". Without the artistic vision and imagination you might have great gear but you will produce boring images and witout the tools and knowledge how to use them, you will be hard pressed to create the image that you "see". I find similar satisfaction in photography as I find in for example playing the piano - creating something (presumably) beautiful(tho the neighbors might strongly disgree) thru disipline, mathematics, practice, patience, emotion and action.

 

I am a geek by profession and have made the observation that those "fellow geeks" who "worship" technology also are the ones who sometimes loose sight for the forest for the trees. I view technology as a tool to accomplish something or provide a solution - and in my ideal world technology would be clever, functional, low maintenance and preferrably invisible. Unfortunately I am finding more and more that technology is becoming an end rather than the means to accomplish something.

Edited by Marjo

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Unfortunately I am finding more and more that technology is becoming an end rather than the means to accomplish something.

 

I suppose that you have pointed out what is really the crux of all this, and to illustrate what you say I am going to post a recent (not underwater) photo taken above my home during a recent spell of sunny but very cold weather. This digitally shot image may or may not grab you but please look at it before reading on.

 

post-1587-1231170270.jpg

 

It is a very crisp, detailed and contrasty image. But what may change your perception of it is that the lens it was shot on is now 40 years old! This is of course entirely irrelevant and is of no interest to most viewers. Whilst technology has progressed this doesn't mean to say that using the latest equipment is actually going to improve either the aesthetic or the technical aspects of an image.

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Ansel Adams didn't know how to run Photoshop but if he were practicing today I bet he'd take a keen interest in it.

 

Technical knowledge and creativity are two different and unrelated things. It's rare to find a great photographer who doesn't know how his camera works or who doesn't care about using good equipment. It's good that engineers responsible for advancing the state of the art don't consider 40 year old technology good enough.

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Godwins law modified to apply to any photography forum: "As a photography usenet/forum/blog discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Ansel Adams approaches one" :dancing:

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Godwins law modified to apply to any photography forum: "As a photography usenet/forum/blog discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Ansel Adams approaches one" :(

 

ROTFLMAO :dancing:

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Just a thought, but if no new camera's etc came out then no one would upgrade meaning that the 2nd hand market would be very small and also much more expensive. Housing an dslr is a big expense and being able to pick up a reasonable priced used system is how I finally moved up from P and S.

Thank you techies.....

 

Rgds

 

Duncan

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HI,

This is a very interesting thread, I can say that I get lost in all technological advances I can say that

my camrea can do so much more than I can ever think it could, but does this bother me, well no.

Just as long as I am happy with my images thats all that matters. I have been on quite a few workshops

& no-one really talks about what their camera can or can do, its more about what images have been taken.

Whats the saying ( beauty in the eye of the beholder ) thats what we all do isn't it??

Andy :dancing::(

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I am happy with my images thats all that matters.

 

Spot on, but ...

 

... there is a minimum acceptable technology for each of us, and it does evolve with time (and ego, I suspect: although there is also the pleasure of bucking the trends and proving your skill by getting results from the simple gear of an earlier era).

 

Me, I'm trying to visit interesting places at the moment, not visiting interesting cameras!

 

Tim

 

:good:

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OK I know this is bad so go head and beat me with a seawhip - just can't help myself:

 

" For uw photography, don't ask your self WWAAD? - Ask yourself WWDDD!"

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OK I know this is bad so go head and beat me with a seawhip - just can't help myself:

 

" For uw photography, don't ask your self WWAAD? - Ask yourself WWDDD!"

Have you ever seen the sh$t the Nat Geo guys travel with? If I had to ask myself that, I'd be running out and making a pretty big investment in extra housings, bodies...you name it.

Hmmm.I'll have to add RED to my list and I don't even do video. :good:

Edited by loftus

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OK I know this is bad so go head and beat me with a seawhip - just can't help myself:

 

" For uw photography, don't ask your self WWAAD? - Ask yourself WWDDD!"

 

Why would I care what Adam Ant and Donald Duck would do? :good:

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One use I love about the "new technology", Is going back on some of my old huge slide collection, and developing them in PS. Some of our old close but not quite shots are now keepers. As Bob dylan said You better start swimming or youll sink like a stone, for the times they are a changing

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