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Shark fin awareness in China

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As I'm sure some of you saw in this thread, my "Cheshire Cat Grin" photo has been splashed (not always in a dignified way) all over the European tabloids.

 

I also got an inquiry from a reporter at the newspaper with the largest circulation in Bejing , and they wrote a quite extensive article about me/the photo: Bejing Evening News article

 

In the e-mail "interview" I did with the reporter, I made a point (realizing that it might be a touchy subject) of saying how so many sharks are being slaughtered for their fins. Frankly, I didn't think they'd include any of that part of my response.

 

I did a rough translation using Google Translate, and, although they didn't quote me very accurately (I didn't say the sharks starve to death, just that they were thrown back to die) and they avoided mentioning shark fin soup, they did at least mention finning. I know that eliminating Chinese demand for shark fins is a long ways off, but hopefully this article will at least touch a few readers who visualize sharks dying finless, and perhaps it might help raise awareness of exactly how fins are obtained. And maybe a few less Chinese people will be inclined to eat shark fin soup next time they have the chance...

 

Anyway, here's the translation of that paragraph:

"Bruce is alarmed by the number of sharks around the world are being killed because of the large number of human beings has been decreasing and in order to satisfy mankind's talking fast, fishermen will be cut off a live shark fin to trafficking, and then their reintroduction into the sea, loss of fins Sharks can only wait for the death of hunger."

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Hey Bruce, I just read the article with a 6 year practicing her chinese. Nice profile.

让布鲁斯感到担忧的是, 全球的鲨鱼数量正在因为人类的大量捕杀日益减少, 为了满足人类的口舌之快, 渔民将鲨鱼鳍活生生地割下来贩卖, 再将它们放归到海中, 失去鳍的鲨鱼只能在饥饿中等待死.

I suspect this paragraph was the writer handcuffed by the editor not to mention the soup. It does hint glibly mention it's to satisfy human being's "happiness of the taste bud" (hey you try translating to a 6 year old).

Well done on the article. I think you may have a future in doing talks for shark conservation and photography groups.

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Well done Bruce. More impressive that the article was done in a local Chinese newspaper. Even if it just convinces 1 local to reconsider shark's fin products, it's a move in a the right direction.

 

I'll see if I can have one of my Chinese colleagues do a quick translation. We just had our annual company Chinese New Year dinner last week and it still peeves me to no end that despite being a major American company supposedly filled with "educated" local Hong Kong Chinese and expats, we continue to serve shark's fin soup at this annual banquet. This despite my protest and reminder that even HSBC, an old HK institution, has banned shark's fin from official functions.

Edited by pakman

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Pakman

It was the local HK VP who set up that mandate in 2003 or 4, after a few months of phone calls and emails. He wasn't popular after that , those damned "soaked in salty water" people. :)

Of course, HSBC Thailand still does promotions with FOO DOO shark's fin restaurant. I made it a point to open and close an account citing dissatisfaction with that to the local VP in BKK last year.

Many believe it is the emulation of the Hong Kong Elite that led to the big rise in demand. Hong Kong was arguable the first major chinese population to become affluent to western world standards. The mainland Chinese noveau riche seem to follow the Hong Kong standards of showing off affluence, including shark fin. This was especially true in the mid 90s as China started emerging as an economy. I think it may be too late to cut that off now since the China affluent population has come into their own. There is also a strong backing of cultural defensiveness (what else?) even though if they looked at it carefully, the historical significance of shark fin as an imperial dish wasn't all that important. It was only made more important in stature by the scarcity of availability in the 60s and 70s. It was also very well marketed by the fin industry, which probably is one of the most sophisticated seafood trading industries.

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To ask Asian stop serving sharks fin is similar to ask Western civilization to stop serving caviar & fore gras. It's interesting to witness Western civilization continues to harrass Asian about their sharks fins consumption whereas we don't see a lot about caviar or fore gras or whatever from the Asian counterpart. It's the same desire about satisfying the taste bud (口舌之快). Furthermore, sharks fin is an ultra expensive delicacy that the consumption contiunue to decrease naturally because the supply is lessen and the price continue to go up. If we have another dot com boom like era when people walk up to a Porchese dealership pay cash for a 911 turbo, then perpahs the demand of sharks fin will go up, otherwise, I think sharks fin consumption just naturally goes down. The other thing with sharks fins is that they need to be aged, just like wine, the specific species and how old they aged drives the price. I suppose part of the crazy killing is so they can stock up and age enough of them for years to satisfy the demand. Fresh sharks fin are less appealing then finely aged sharks fins. I don't oppose sharks fin consumption, I think we should have farm raise sharks for meat and fins much like farm raise fish, shrimp, port belly, lamb shank, kobe beef, whatever. Food chains can be manage. I think there are lot of things in this world kill and imbalance our natural resources, build a million dollars yatcht probably damage far more natural resources than a few bowls of sharks fin soup. Oh, last time I had a bowl of sharks fin soup was 3 years ago but I had some really nice fore gras last week. And the fore gras taste a whole lot better :-)

 

Cheers !

Edited by CADiver

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Well CADiver

Foie Gras and caviar (white surgeon) are both farmed. Both are sustainable now (but the wild sturgeon population is pretty dismal like the sharks).

Sharks don't farm well. It takes a long time (up to 15 years, depending on species) for the sharks to mature and reproduce. In that 15 years, the farm has to feed and nuture the shark, hoping it will produce. Also pelagic sharks generally don't do well in captivity. Farming is not an economical or practical solution.

The marketing of other shark parts came about in the 80s with the advent of the shark cartilage having anti-cancer and bone healing properties. It was later proven to be BS but that spike was also coincided with the asians growing in affluence, particularly the chinese.

And you are right about the aged sharks fin, which is why what the market is consuming now is slow being released by the sharks fin traders, who are controlling supply. They know it's not sustainable because sharks are going quickly extinct. There are warehouses full of shark fin waiting like diamonds are held in vaults to control market prices. You are wrong about shark fin consumption going down as the trend has been upward(with a few down spikes in recent years due to finning education, mercury scares etc).

When the price of fin goes up to ultra expensive levels, it also means shark population will have been decimated, perhaps to the point of no recovery. I doubt anyone can justify being against any sort of consumption if it is sustainable and also does not affect the eco system. Clearly, with tens of millions of sharks being pulled out of the sea, this is not the case.

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So is the conclusion Asian the spieces in this planet continue to consume endanger spieces/natural resources that are responsible for the destruction of earth ? Probably, after all they have the most population on earth, if everyone frat at the same time over there, the whole earth going to stink. And Chinese New Year coming up this weekend, many sharks fin going to be cooked unfortunately. Wait let's figure out how to keep the mercury level super high on all those big fish, then no one is going to eat them for sure. Would that work ? May be more Sea Sherpred patrol ...

... I better shut up and get back to just learn how to take pictures underwater. Pologize if I offended anybody, I have a strange way of humoring myself sometimes that other probably disgust.

:-)

Edited by CADiver

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So is the conclusion Asian the spieces in this planet continue to consume endanger spieces/natural resources that are responsible for the destruction of earth ? Probably, after all they have the most population on earth, if everyone frat at the same time over there, the whole earth going to stink. And Chinese New Year coming up this weekend, many sharks fin going to be cooked unfortunately. Wait let's figure out how to keep the mercury level super high on all those big fish, then no one is going to eat them for sure. Would that work ? May be more Sea Sherpred patrol ...

... I better shut up and get back to just learn how to take pictures underwater. Pologize if I offended anybody, I have a strange way of humoring myself sometimes that other probably disgust.

:-)

 

Hi Cad,

 

The conclusion is that eating shark fins in the 21st century as a luxury item is a luxury we can do without- and needs to be stopped now- if we are to conserve the species.

Many fisheries can be sustainable- shark fisheries arent-period- evolution and biology sees to that-wheither we like shark fin soup or not.

It really is that simple.

 

The choice is ours-do we want sharks to be around swimming in the seas for future generations to hopefully see face to face, marvel at, and photograph?.....or do we remove them from the earth forever for the sake of a gourmets delight- and accept the consequences of loosing yet another vital part of the oceans ecosystem??

 

I for one- just want to know sharks will still be around when I reach 70.

At the rate we're going-this may be a wish and no more.

 

Damo

 

ps. I love Asian people. I love its cuisine- and I would love to visit Asia some day- and dive with her sharks.

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... Furthermore, sharks fin is an ultra expensive delicacy that the consumption contiunue to decrease naturally because the supply is lessen and the price continue to go up. If we have another dot com boom like era when people walk up to a Porchese dealership pay cash for a 911 turbo, then perpahs the demand of sharks fin will go up, otherwise, I think sharks fin consumption just naturally goes down. ...

Cheers !

 

Oh, I just realilze I said something incredibly wrong yesterday, my apology. In the traditional day, sharks fin was and still is an expensive delicacy but the market had made them otherwise. I was picking some gocery today and suddenly something caught my eye, a couple racks of spam, no, it's a couple racks of sharks fin soup in a can !! Chinese new year celebration this weekend, that's why they are on promotion. So I pick up a can and read it's ingerdient, indeed it has sharks fin, not imitate sharks fin !! Now that changes the whole game isn't it ? For a little less than $10USD a can, you now have shark fin soup. This provide much greater and easier access to the public and this is now a serious industry, isn't it ?! I know they are not going to put high quality fins in a can but still it is what it is, it still has to come from some sharks.

 

So I wrote down some info from the can

http://www.good-plenty.com.tw/product.php

#0307 is what I saw in the market.

http://www.lianhwausa.com/product.php?no=112502710

 

Someone should write to their CEO and ask them to stop the canning factory & fin processing plant, close down the operations and laid-off a few thousands employees because it's bad to kill sharks for their fin. Let the sharks live and go figure out a new job. Do they put whales in a can too ? If they do, someone should write to those Nordic operations as well.

If I come across other label/supplier of these can sharks fin, I will let you all know.

 

 

Cheers !

Edited by CADiver

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Ecology is hard to manage in a democracy isn't it?

 

I think we may try to touch politics instead of touching commercials.

touching politics can most of the time only be done by touching people.

do a manifestation in China of several millions people saying they want shark fin soup-or cans- to be totally forbidden, and the problem will be over.

how to make this happen? communication, organisation, and hope.

 

let's start in U.S or Europe to vote against important things like shrimps exportation, sharks killing, and then we'll be able to speak.

 

If every single country in the world make laws again shark fishing, china will not have enought sharks in their own waters to continue dealing with this.

 

I'm studying sharks in french polynesia, it's forbiden here to fish sharks, and French Polynesia is as big as Europe. sharks are everywhere, populations are heathly.

will they recover everywhere else when more areas will be safe? no all species will.

will we make more areas safe for them?

I believe we will.

saying everything is dark and sharks are dying will not be how to get out of this.

let's speak about hope, about how things can be good, about "everything will be fine one day, so let's do it now".

 

Let's build the world we want, not scream at the world we don't.

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Someone should write to their CEO and ask them to stop the canning factory & fin processing plant, close down the operations and laid-off a few thousands employees because it's bad to kill sharks for their fin. Let the sharks live and go figure out a new job. Do they put whales in a can too ? If they do, someone should write to those Nordic operations as well.

So you want to use the selective singling out of a culture and affect jobs arguments to counter point? Most if not all industries deemed unhealthy wind down when the industry has severe side effects (note asbesto production in the US etc) or when stocks are depleted. The sardine fishery off the west coast of North America collapsed after they basically hurt the stock so much that it was banned. The fishermen lost their jobs and moved on, much like the Bajau do, when they deplete a fish stock.

The fact is that the Asian market is the largest consumer shark fin. Fishermen around the world are capitalizing on this, much like they do on every other resource. It is easier to end the consumption/demand of the resource than to end the producers since it is uncontrollable in so many ways. By targeting the consumers, the campaigns target the asians, particularly the chinese (not the nation but the culture) by default, unless you are saying that that finning and dumping the shark carcass overboard is not for the soup market but for the cartilage supplement market?

If we, as a species, cannot learn from our abject past, then we deserve what we get. Hindsight is what gives us foresight.

 

If every single country in the world make laws again shark fishing, china will not have enought sharks in their own waters to continue dealing with this.

Actually it won't since the oceans are international and so finning will always continue. The only feasible way is to end consumption or at least drastically reduce it.

 

I'm studying sharks in french polynesia, it's forbiden here to fish sharks, and French Polynesia is as big as Europe. sharks are everywhere, populations are heathly.

will they recover everywhere else when more areas will be safe? no all species will.

When the shark population elsewhere is wiped out, you'll be seeing illegal fishing in your area. It's not if but when.

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Hey Bruce, Way to go!!! :drink: The Beijing Evening News should be commended for featuring an article about the award-winning amateur underwater photographer, Bruce - his love for sharks, scuba diving & also his charity work! :drink: ! Wonder how big its circulation is but it is a good reminder nearing the Chinese New Year! imho, the article is quite well written - clear & simple Chinese is used. I will do literal translation for this short paragraph

让布鲁斯感到担忧的是, 全球的鲨鱼数量正在因为人类的大量捕杀日益减少, 为了满足人类的口舌之快, 渔民将鲨鱼鳍活生生地割下来贩卖, 再将它们放归到海中, 失去鳍的鲨鱼只能在饥饿中等待死.

"The thing that worries Bruce is, the global shark population is rapidly declining due to man's massive catch/kill, just to satisfy man's taste bud, fishermen slice off the fins from the live sharks to sell & then throw the sharks back into the sea, the finless sharks will starve to death."

 

I am very pleased that the Chinese Government is supportive & did not serve sharkfin for the Olympics official banquets. Wildaid is doing well with working with the top celebrities (NBA star Yao Ming, HK kungfu star Jackie Chan) to spread the anti shark's fin & conservation messages. Came across this... CNN Commentary: Only China can Save our Sharks

 

IMHO, all these publicity will work (USA has her 1st black President :) ) but it is going to take years of continuously educating the public abt the plight of sharks. I hope that it will work & hopefully the sharks will still be there when the day comes.

 

Singapore is one of the major import/export hubs of the Asian sharkfins trade (u will know what I mean aft watching Shark Waters)... However, I have a feeling that the anti-shark's fin message is slowly working its way into the Singaporean's conscience (WildAid, with popular S'porean singer Sun Yanzi played a part), I think few people of the younger generation (below 40) still equate shark's fin soup with status, maybe shark fin soup is so common now (in cans! :drink:) that it lost its appeal... Furthermore, some younger S'poreans consider Chinese restaurants & cuisines are old-fashioned... On the personal front, I have put my foot down & told all my friends to leave me out of their wedding banquets if they want to serve shark's fin soup, I hate the feeling of helplessness, sitting at the banquets & watching others slurp their bowls of shark's fin soup.

 

I have secret (not so secret now) hopes that this economic crisis will allow some relieve to the shark population. :)

 

Oh can someone quickly enlighten me, do the finless sharks drown or starve to death? I guess some species do drown, while some starve to death...

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Hey Bruce, Way to go!!! :) The Beijing Evening News should be commended for featuring an article about the award-winning amateur underwater photographer, Bruce - his love for sharks, scuba diving & also his charity work! :) ! Wonder how big its circulation is but it is a good reminder nearing the Chinese New Year! imho, the article is quite well written - clear & simple Chinese is used. I will do literal translation for this short paragraph

让布鲁斯感到担忧的是, 全球的鲨鱼数量正在因为人类的大量捕杀日益减少, 为了满足人类的口舌之快, 渔民将鲨鱼鳍活生生地割下来贩卖, 再将它们放归到海中, 失去鳍的鲨鱼只能在饥饿中等待死.

"The thing that worries Bruce is, the global shark population is rapidly declining due to man's massive catch/kill, just to satisfy man's taste bud, fishermen slice off the fins from the live sharks to sell & then throw the sharks back into the sea, the finless sharks will starve to death."

 

Thanks, Xariatay, for the literal translation, and for the other encouraging info about shark-fin soup in your post. It's easy to focus entirely on the negative, so it's nice to be reminded that some progress is being made! :drink:

 

Frankly, I was really surprised that they did a full page article! The reporter apparently did some extensive internet searches and found all kinds of info about me, as well as using my answers to specific questions. I was especially happy that they mentioned both charities I've raised a little money for...you never know when that might lead to other people pitching in! :drink:

 

To answer your question, internet searches seem to place daily circulation of the Bejing Evening News around 800,000 to 1,000,000 :drink: - "one of the world's top hundred daily newspapers based on circulation." With that many readers (Chinese readers!), I'd like to think that my smiling shark touched at least a few of them and - in conjunction with the things you mentioned - will make them think of finless dying sharks next time they look at shark-fin soup...

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"I'm studying sharks in french polynesia, it's forbiden here to fish sharks, and French Polynesia is as big as Europe. sharks are everywhere, populations are heathly."

 

Glad to hear that they are not having problems, when I was there in 2002-2004 there was a Taiwanese guy paying for shark fins and boats were reporting seeing and photos were taken of sharks finless and lined up on the beaches.

 

So good, I am glad its working, the populations are doing well but the hard part will be keeping them that way.

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Singapore is one of the major import/export hubs of the Asian sharkfins trade (u will know what I mean aft watching Shark Waters)... However, I have a feeling that the anti-shark's fin message is slowly working its way into the Singaporean's conscience (WildAid, with popular S'porean singer Sun Yanzi played a part), I think few people of the younger generation (below 40) still equate shark's fin soup with status, maybe shark fin soup is so common now (in cans! :)) that it lost its appeal... Furthermore, some younger S'poreans consider Chinese restaurants & cuisines are old-fashioned... On the personal front, I have put my foot down & told all my friends to leave me out of their wedding banquets if they want to serve shark's fin soup, I hate the feeling of helplessness, sitting at the banquets & watching others slurp their bowls of shark's fin soup.

Oh can someone quickly enlighten me, do the finless sharks drown or starve to death? I guess some species do drown, while some starve to death...

Xaria, I know quite a few singaporeans who are non-divers but have stopped consuming shark fin soup. Unfortunately, the growing population of Singapore has adopted a large number of mainland chinese who don't have such sensibilities. With any economic downturn, luxury food items usually take a hit. However, the shark fin traders are in it for the long run, so they can milk their inventory. They can lose 30% and still be up because they know demand will come back when the Asian economies recover.

And yes, finned sharks either die of starvation, drowning or are in turned eaten by other fish.

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Thanks, Xariatay, for the literal translation, and for the other encouraging info about shark-fin soup in your post. It's easy to focus entirely on the negative, so it's nice to be reminded that some progress is being made! :drink:

 

Frankly, I was really surprised that they did a full page article! The reporter apparently did some extensive internet searches and found all kinds of info about me, as well as using my answers to specific questions. I was especially happy that they mentioned both charities I've raised a little money for...you never know when that might lead to other people pitching in! :drink:

 

To answer your question, internet searches seem to place daily circulation of the Bejing Evening News around 800,000 to 1,000,000 :drink: - "one of the world's top hundred daily newspapers based on circulation." With that many readers (Chinese readers!), I'd like to think that my smiling shark touched at least a few of them and - in conjunction with the things you mentioned - will make them think of finless dying sharks next time they look at shark-fin soup...

 

Wow! Congratulations! 800k to 1m people would have seen that photo! :) Think everyone with a camera wants to take photographs (of anything & everything) that leaves an impression & yours makes an impact! I believe that many of the readers would be touched, the engaging photo would attract them to read the article & they would have absorbed some of the shark conservation message. Better still, maybe some kids would read that & then go spread the shark conservation message to their parents & grandparents! Hey, u will be be as famous as Yao Ming soon! :) I wonder if the editor would be brave enough to feature another shark conservation article soon! Every opportunity to reach out & tell people abt sharks is precious, although it still hurts us all to see & hear millions of sharks being killed... Let us all keep up our efforts & not give up the "fight"! Coincidentally your smiling shark photo is used a Chinese friend (also diver) as his MSN avatar, he said it was in the MSN news!

PS. The title reads "Good Photo Must be 1 & Only". Oh & I am so inspired that I will do an unsolicited unprofessional literal translation of the whole article soon!

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PS. The title reads "Good Photo Must be 1 & Only". Oh & I am so inspired that I will do an unsolicited unprofessional literal translation of the whole article soon!

 

I would love it if you did a literal translation! :) I used Google Translate, and most of the sentences made only limited sense in English!

 

Another word for "1 and Only" in the title would be "unique", which I think refers to my comments in the article about having the right camera settings, etc. (i.e., it was a "good" albeit far from perfect photo technically), but that the thing that really won the contest was the uniqueness of the "expression" on the shark's face.

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I would love it if you did a literal translation! :) I used Google Translate, and most of the sentences made only limited sense in English!

 

Another word for "1 and Only" in the title would be "unique", which I think refers to my comments in the article about having the right camera settings, etc. (i.e., it was a "good" albeit far from perfect photo technically), but that the thing that really won the contest was the uniqueness of the "expression" on the shark's face.

 

独一无二 is indeed "one and only"

 

One interpretation of the title could be - a good picture should be unique an no other similar of it's kind. In this case it's unique because of the smile.

 

The link doesn't take me to page where I can read the entire article, I try using a magniflying glass and still didn't help. Is there another link to the same article that we can actually read the character ?

Edited by CADiver

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独一无二 is indeed "one and only"

 

One interpretation of the title could be - a good picture should be unique an no other similar of it's kind. In this case it's unique because of the smile.

 

The link doesn't take me to page where I can read the entire article, I try using a magniflying glass and still didn't help. Is there another link to the same article that we can actually read the character ?

 

:) Thanks! Unique is just fine but just not "one & only".

 

Maybe u can try downloading the pdf http://newepaper.bjd.com.cn/bjwb/page/81/2...9011720_pdf.pdf

Or http://newepaper.bjd.com.cn/bjwb/html/2009...tent_109087.htm

 

Ok, will do translation soon.

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This is the translation. :lol: There are sentences which could be better structured (since they sounded like broken "English") but have decided to leave them alone... :) Words with (?) mean I am unsure if correctly translated.

 

A Good Photograph Must Be One & Only

 

For 54 year old amateur photographer Bruce Yates, the recently arrived Natures' Best Photography Award 2008 is an astonishing gift for the new year. Due to scuba diving, he fell in love with underwater photography and also manages his hobby very well, Bruce, who is the boss of an investment company, photographed a “smiling” lemon shark and became the “Marine Winner” of the Nature Best Photography Competition, defeating over 20000 entries.

 

My Lens Was Just a Few Inches Away from the Shark

When Bruce Yates submitted this photograph for the competition, he named it “Cheshire Cat”, from an English proverb “grinning like a Cheshire Cat”. In the photograph, the shark is showing snow-white teeth, with a very cartoon-like “smiling” expression, “That was an 'expression' I have never seen on a shark, I don't know that I would have an opportunity to take a photograph like that”, Bruce Yates said. However, he admitted that the shark only looked like it was smiling, in actual fact, at that moment, it had just preyed on small fish and was about to close its mouth.

The photograph was taken in July 2007, when Bruce and his wife went to Bahamas north-west many miles from the land, partly for scuba diving, the other reason is to see sharks. “At that time, there were more than 10 sharks around the boat, they were competing to capture the small fishes in the waters. “I took this photograph from the boat's platform and put the camera half-submerged in the water. Before that, I set the shutter, aperture and flash (so that the sunset can be seen clearly), and fixed a 15mm fisheye lens. Once the camera is half-submerged, the 8 foot shark was just a few inches away.”

As all know, sharks are the marine food chain's apex predator; Spielberg's Jaw's increased the sharks' image of terror to the max. It is not a small risk to photograph shark at such close distant. After this email interview with Bruce Yates, his answers eased the worry. In Bruce's eyes, lemon shark is a more docile type of shark. “I have experienced being in the waters with over a hundred sharks, but I have never been afraid. Although their teeth make them look very fierce, the lemon sharks' threat to men is actually minuscule.

Bruce said he had encounters with bull sharks (?), tiger sharks and hammer-head sharks etc and also other sharks. He mentioned that it is indeed essential to maintain utmost vigilance around some sharks (especially bull sharks & tiger sharks), but with lemon sharks, it is not so. “Lemon sharks commands fear and respect and is a wonder type of sharks. Unfortunately, when we observe them in water, we have to keep a further distant, of course, if you fear them, distant to you is a fortunate thing.” Bruce said, “Ordinary people who like to get close to the sharks, should be accompanied by professionals who understand the sharks' habits. Under their supervision, with careful attention to one's behavior and not to excite or anger the sharks, the risk of sharks’ attacks is very low. In actual fact, people who are killed by sharks' bite are far less than people killed by dogs, attacked by venomous snakes or killed by bicycle or skiing accidents.

The thing that worries Bruce is: the global shark population is rapidly declining due to man's massive catch/kill. In order to satisfy man's taste bud, fishermen slice off the fins from the live sharks to sell and then throw the sharks back into the sea, leaving the finless sharks to starve to death.

 

Started underwater photography at age 40

Understanding sharks is the result of long-term interaction with these marine creatures. Although Bruce is an amateur underwater photographer, he already has 15 years of underwater photography experience.

At 40 years old, he received his scuba certificate and fell in love with this sport. After a few years of diving, he decided to try underwater video-graphy. At first, he used video camera to capture the underwater scenes but the problem was that video frequency edition could only be done at home. So, video camera was changed into a 35mm SLR. In 2000, the SLR was changed to a DSLR, and Bruce also custom made a waterproof camera housing.

Other than photography, Bruce is the owner of an investment company, with 17 employees; the company has been operating for more than 20 years, with clients spread over the 26 states of America. Bruce said underwater photography is his most enjoyed escape from mundane life. His favorite location is Indonesia's Raja Ampat and Papua New Guinea, because these places have unique marine creatures.

Other than underwater photography, Bruce also occasionally shoots some wildlife on land, such as precious moments of adult polar bears strolling with cubs and brown bears catching fish at Carter (?) National Park. Bruce said these photographs are shot when he joined nature tours; they always kept safe distant from the bears, so they were not afraid of being attacked. “At some situations especially when being threatened or startled, then the bears will attack, but humans are not in their daily food chain, so they are not very interested in us.”

Bruce prefers underwater photography to land photography. “In water, the target/intention of photography is usually clear, a fish, a sea turtle, or the coral reef. However, on land, many things will create disturbance to the shoot, I no longer have the artistic feeling that I have for the underwater photography. But I am working to overcome this.”

During the interview, Bruce frankly admitted that he did not feel that his photography skills won the judges over. “I think, the reason this photograph stood out from more than 20 thousand photographs was the unique expression on the shark's face. This photograph was not perfect in terms of skills but the shark showing the toothy grin could immediately attract attention, obviously, it also worked on the judges. This also means that not only specialists or professional photographers can shoot good photographs. If you have talents, plus enough experience, you can also capture a one and only, attention grabbing photograph.”

 

Donated over 10 Thousand USD to Charity

Bruce said he has not thought about earning money from photography, but he has a website which the interviewer is able to browse and buy his photographs in different sizes.

In 2007, Bruce carefully chose 12 photographs of marine creatures and created a calendar for sale on the website and earned 12 thousand usd which he donated entirely to PKD Foundation.

PKD is a genetic disease, the growth in the kidney will cause kidney failure, sufferers must continuously receive dialysis and only kidney transplant can save them. According to PKD Foundation website, there are more sufferers of PKD than sufferers of genetic pancreatic disease, muscular atrophy, Hemophilia, Tang syndrome but not many people have heard of it.

Bruce first learned of PKD because 2 staff of his company has family members who suffered from it. “I convinced the company's partner to pay for the costs of the producing the calendars.” Bruce chose some of his favorites from a few hundred photographs and ingeniously put together all the months. “For November, I chose an orange color green salmon, because it looks like a pumpkin.” Bruce plans to donate all the revenue from the 2008 calendars to the International Children's Surgery Fund.

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This is the translation. :lol: There are sentences which could be better structured (since they sounded like broken "English") but have decided to leave them alone... :) Words with (?) mean I am unsure if correctly translated...

 

Xariatay,

 

Thanks SO much for the translation! I know it probably took you a long time, but you are FAR better than Google Translate! ;)

 

They took some liberties with some of my comments, and changed some things outright (e.g., my wife was NOT with me on that trip :) , and it was an orange frogfish, not green salmon!), but overall it was a very flattering article, and I was really honored they wrote such an extensive article at all! :)

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Xariatay,

 

Thanks SO much for the translation! I know it probably took you a long time, but you are FAR better than Google Translate! :B):

 

They took some liberties with some of my comments, and changed some things outright (e.g., my wife was NOT with me on that trip :( , and it was an orange frogfish, not green salmon!), but overall it was a very flattering article, and I was really honored they wrote such an extensive article at all! :)

 

You are most welcome! :lobster: It did take longer than I have expected!

Oops, sorry, my error!! 青蛙鱼 = frogfish! I used the yahoo Babel Fish & dumped the 3 chinese words in, it came out as salmon & I didn't use my brains! :wacko: should have realized 青蛙 = frog & 鱼 = fish...

& discover the other error, should be October not November... can't amend the original post.. :sorry:

Edited by xariatay

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This is all really good news! The more this word spreads, the better!

 

Not to hijack the thread, but I also strongly believe that we need to remember the cruel slaughtering of dolphins in the seas of Japan as well!

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Not to hijack the thread, but I also strongly believe that we need to remember the cruel slaughtering of dolphins in the seas of Japan as well!

 

Not a hijack at all, Andre! If I (or anyone else) could get as much attention for a dolphin shot as the grinning shark has gotten, maybe we could make a small dent in public opinion for dolphins as well. This is about the closest I've come to a dolphin shot that has human interest value (I call it "Who's Posing for Whom?"):

393782239_Zjkwu-M.jpg

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