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Salt water crocodile attack at Blue Water Mangroves

Killing predators to protect a dive site:  

123 members have voted

  1. 1. Should they kill the salt water crocodile that attacked a diver in Raja Empat?

    • Yes, to protect other divers in this popular dive site. They should remove the threat.
      6
    • No, they should find another solution ( catch and release it elsewhere. etc)
      112
    • I'm not sure as both sides have a point.
      5


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There is unsubstantiated talk about someone stabbing the eye of the croc in order to get it to release the diver.However, I'm trying to reach Ricardo of the Ondina to confirm this. As usual there is a lot of chatter that facts just don't come clearly.

The issue of liability is one of those things. There would be a public outcry if another person got bit about how the government or authorities didn't do anything to prevent it. All lame and BS but we all know it is pervasive thinking.

Relocation seems very unlikely due to local issues (can you imagine if someone dropped that particular croc near a local village and it attacked a local?).

If the croc is injured in the eye, the pressure to kill it will only increase. An injured croc can't hunt as well and humans would be considered easier prey. That seems to be the thinking (whether right or wrong isn't really an issue)

The other issue is that the news may hit locals who will take action on their own regardless of local authorities.

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There is unsubstantiated talk about someone stabbing the eye of the croc in order to get it to release the diver. However, I'm trying to reach Ricardo of the Ondina to confirm this. As usual there is a lot of chatter that facts just don't come clearly.

The issue of liability is one of those things. There would be a public outcry if another person got bit about how the government or authorities didn't do anything to prevent it. All lame and BS but we all know it is pervasive thinking.

Relocation seems very unlikely due to local issues (can you imagine if some foreign NGO dropped that particular croc near a local village and it attacked a local?).

If the croc is injured in the eye, the pressure to kill it will only increase. An injured croc can't hunt as well and humans would be considered easier prey. That seems to be the thinking (whether right or wrong isn't really an issue)

The other issue is that the news may hit locals who will take action on their own regardless of local authorities.

 

 

 

I was following this thread and waiting to see if some details come available because i was thinking that maybe that croc is injured or have some handicap . Now that i saw Lauren post about a croc with a missing leg probably that's the same croc that bite the diver .

 

Hope to see a report with the real facts . By now the blue water mangroves have seen many divers so why this happened now ? was the diver chasing it or was in their way or near a nest or the croc just targeted the diver as a prey ?

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Let's not assume the croc Lauren saw was the same one that attacked in the latest incident. There have been reports of crocs in Nampale for years. Several people have seen them in the swamps. There's no reason to think there's only one. Misool is close enough whereby the croc could've come from there, probably after being kicked out by the alpha male.

The best advice I've been given is not to snorkel alone around crocs. You're at the losing end of a breath hold endurance. Going deep and maintaining eye contact while making a hasty retreat is probably the best.

I'm pretty sure the details of this particular attack will not be truly known if not told by the diver himself. Hopefully it's not one of our members.

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I have received an email from one of the passengers of the Ondina who was on the boat when this happened.

Apparently the victim had no camera and did actually hurt the croc's eye. Hopefully this person will post more details when he gets settled at home.

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I have received an email from one of the passengers of the Ondina who was on the boat when this happened.

Apparently the victim had no camera and did actually hurt the croc's eye. Hopefully this person will post more details when he gets settled at home.

 

Hi all. As the regional coordinator for Conservation International's Bird's Head Seascape marine conservation program (which includes Raja Ampat), I'd like to quickly clarify a few misperceptions about the management response to this croc attack:

 

1) While there are a number of international NGOs (amongst them Conservation International and The Nature Conservancy) and local NGOs (including Papua Sea Turtle Foundation, Yayasan Nazareth, Belantara, etc) assisting the Raja Ampat government in its efforts to manage its marine resources (including the 7 marine parks which now span Raja Ampat), none of these can be said to "be in charge" of Raja Ampat. NGOs have no legal basis to manage Raja Ampat's reefs - we are simply facilitators. Moreover, I note that the Nampale Blue Water Mangrove site where the attack occurred is not actually within one of the marine parks which the NGOs facilitate the management of. The main point here is that NGOs have neither the authority to capture/kill this crocodile nor any liability were another diver to be attacked

 

2) Saltwater crocodiles are a protected species in Indonesia due to their threatened population status. Killing one is illegal unless done by the authorities vested with this power - in this case the Indonesian Department of Nature Conservation (PHKA). We have reported the attack to this authority so they are aware of this, but beyond this we have no intention of pursuing this crocodile. We will, however, monitor the response of the Department and in particular try to ensure that IF they decide to hunt down the injured animal (in my opinion unlikely), that this is done professionally and in a targeted manner that does not resort to a "witch hunt" that results in the needless deaths of multiple animals.

 

3) As members of conservation NGOs, I think I probably speak for all/most of us in saying that we are delighted that 4m crocodiles still exist in Raja Ampat and are committed to ensuring this remains the case. And that we echo the general sentiments expressed in this thread - ie, that divers must accept the risk of possible attacks by predators when they dive in a place like Raja Ampat - indeed, as divers we should revel in the fact that there are still areas we can dive where large predators still exist. Sadly, this is not the case on many of the reefs of the world today.

 

We are nonetheless relieved that the diver who was attacked managed to free himself, and wish him (and the croc) a speedy recovery. We'd advise that all divers/dive operators planning to visit mangrove areas in Raja Ampat and Papua in general take serious note of the risks involved, while also noting that these "blue water mangrove" areas are of course stunningly beautiful and offer unique dive and photography opportunities. I close in noting that I'm intrigued by Drew's suggestion to radio-collar this injured animal to monitor its movements (and its hopeful recovery) - I'd be keen to hear Drew's conclusions from researching this possibility...

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Mark

Thanks for chiming in with valuable info with your busy schedule. As you and I both know, just cos it's illegal in Indonesia doesn't mean it's not done.

I'll forward you the info I've found on the radio collar once the research crew gets back to me ... but I'm afraid it'll be prohibitively expensive for a single croc unless someone in JKT wants to fund the "research". The problems are replacing the battery on the radio collar and distributing the radio receivers among all the boats. The collar can work the other way where photogs will want to find the croc to shoot it and probably start another incident or at the least harass the heck out of it. No win situation.

I'm actually glad I don't have to write a petition to help protect the croc now that you are aware of the situation and can relay some tourist reaction to the relevant authorities.

Again thanks for coming in for this.

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As 'Gudge' said.

From the land of crocodiles here in Australia, crocs regularly attack humans and fail to raise the interests of the media.

This bloke has now grown to a size and sexual maturity where he now believes that he has to defend his territory from all intruders.

I would also be so bold as to predict the recent arrival of a certain little girl saltie that seems to have aroused his testosterone levels.

Leave him alone. . . . If he 'has' to be removed, there are plenty of burly Australians well versed in the capture and release of saltwater crocs.

 

Bruce...

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Since this has apparently happened AT LEAST twice now, I'd be curious to know what, if anything, boats are telling their divers when they go to this area. Are they warning them? It's one thing to dive there with the knowledge of the threat. Then it is a calculated risk. It's another is the boat staff aren't being honest about the facts . . .

 

Mike

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Well Mike, I'm very sure they will be mentioning it now for Nampale. ;)

I've gone to Indo quite a few times over the years and only 2 cruise directors have ever mentioned the possibility of crocs. The same 2 even took me to look for the crocs.

To be fair to the operators, I don't think they are being dishonest. Salties are ALL over the Indonesian islands (well the less populated ones who haven't killed them off). Anywhere there's an estuarine environment or areas of mangrove, there is a possibility of a croc being there. I mean on 3 trips I've been on, we've run into crocs serendipitously in 3 different areas, Papua Barat, Wetar and some island near Misool. It's very difficult to foresee where the crocs might be hiding. Do they have to warn about the possibility on every site?

 

I would also like to take this opportunity to apologize for the possible allusion that the NGOs would be responsible for killing the croc. I wasn't clear in that exclusion that the NGOs are not responsible for the croc in any way.

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Crocodile Attack in Raja Ampat Mangroves

 

I realize there is an ongoing thread in this forum concerning the recent crocodile attack, but chose to start a new thread rather than tack on a 3rd (or perhaps 4th or 5th by now) page on top of the speculations.

 

Since shortly after the attack I've known about it, but since I could only get 3rd hand info decided to wait until I could speak face to face with some of the SMY Ondina crew and get the facts from those who were present at the time. I've just had dinner with the cruise director and one of the divemasters who were there. Tomorrow I will speak with the divemaster who was actually in the water with the croc and diver, so will post again on about May 4 when I return to Sorong.

 

The diver, Daniel, a non-photographer, British, technical diver with about 1000 dives was diving with his buddy and a divemaster on the 3rd dive of the day in the mangrove area. They had completed their dive and were heading slowly toward the surface. They were perhaps 4 meters from the edge of the mangroves.

 

Upon surfacing the divemaster saw a crocodile enter the water. He told the two divers and instructed them to get off the surface and dive deep. One diver and the divemaster did so. The other didn't hear (or possibly understand) stayed on the surface and the crocodile went straight for him, grabbing the diver around the neck and putting a large deep gash across his neck just under the chin.

 

The croc released the diver and immediately came back, grabbed the diver by the arm and hand and started dragging the diver down and shaking (rolling?) the diver who had the presence of mind to get his second reg and put it in his mouth meanwhile wresting with the crocodile. They struggled.

 

The buddy and divemaster came for the croc. The buddy tried to open the croc's mouth and free his friend (can you imagine?). Both the divemaster and buddy were poking at the croc's eyes with their fingers to try to get it to release Daniel and finally it did.

 

The dive tender was already beside the divers so they lifted Daniel onto the tender while one of the crew was hitting the croc with an oar.

 

A dentist on board cleaned the wounds, stitched up Daniel's chin and (I'm not clear on this) hand and arm. He was evacuated to a Sorong hospital by speedboat while the rest of the group continued their dive trip.

 

The surgeon at the Sorong hospital determined that the tendons in Daniel's hand were cut and wanted to do the surgery to repair them. Instead the dentist (guest diver) recommended that the injuries did not need immediate repair and that they be cleaned and Daniel prepared for a flight to some place with better medical facilities.

 

Daniel flew to Singapore with his buddy where he has already undergone 2 surgeries to repair the tendons in his hand and, I hear tonight, a third surgery is planned. Ondina's CD had been in touch daily with the injured diver.

 

The crocodile was not provoked, poked, prodded, fed or photographed by these divers, the crew or anyone from Ondina. The crew, divers, divemasters did not know it was there and had not seen any crocodiles at that site this season. We rarely see a croc in Raja Ampat but are aware they do exist.

 

There is no plan (at least from the SMY Ondina owners or crew) to attack, shoot, relocate or do anything with this crocodile. Ondina's crew is somewhat perplexed about the

 

Should they kill the saltie croc which just attacked a diver?

 

topic/poll and where it started. They are wondering why someone without the facts is speculating on a public forum.

 

The Ondina is not planning to dive the area anytime soon.. and I doubt any amount of money would get that divemaster back into the water there after watching this attack.

 

My opinion: Any diver or diver operator who chooses to dive in this area knowing full well this crocodile is there and willing to attack without provocation should do it on their own. They should not risk the dive holiday of the (other) divers aboard their ship or the lives of the crew & divemasters who would consider it their duty to try and save a diver from a crocodile attack. It is not worth risking lives for even an award winning photo or to sell a spot on a dive trip. To think otherwise is silly and selfish.

 

We have informed our group of photo/video divers of the incident (most of whom had specified the mangroves as one site they were most interested to visit) and they have decided unanimously to give it a miss after hearing the details of the attack from the people who were aboard at the time.

 

 

[EDIT BY MODERATOR (AM)] - Apologies to Deb for merging the threads - this was the start of a second thread - but I believe it makes sense to put all this information in a single place.

Edited by Alex_Mustard

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Thanks Deb,

 

Nice to hear some information from somewhere closer to the source. Sounds like a very scary situation and it also sounds like everyone (victim, buddy, divemaster, tender crew) is very lucky to be as OK as they are. As someone who has been there on trips where I and other photographers are often solo diving up the shallow channels, searching for that "perfect shot", this brings a new perspective to the wisdom of that practice. The tenders are normally nearby but certainly can't easily get into some of the areas that determined photographers can. What if the victim had been without his buddy and the divemaster? I shudder to think.

 

Mike

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Thanks for that clarification.

I guess one has to assume that such attacks are possible from this croc or others anywhere in the area.

The question then arises what decisions are taken and to what degree divers are informed and cautioned or prevented from diving in ANY area where these animals are known to exist.

Two months ago I was diving in Jardin de la Reina where there is at least one well known resident salt water croc. We saw him at night around the boat and I was diving there the next day. There have not been any attacks YET, but it is quite possible there will be one in the future. Should diving be cautioned against in any area where there are crocs? I'm not suggesting one thing or another, I'd like to hear what others think.

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DebF has just posted a new thread with facts about the Crocodile attack at the Blue Mangroves in the Misool area.

She would have made this post but the Orchid lounge was closing and the internet connection at the Meridien Hotel was not working so I posted it for her.

 

"I realize this is an ongoing thread in this forum concerning the recent crocodile attack, but chose to start a new thread rather than tack on a 3rd (or perhaps 4th or 5th by now) page on top of the speculations."

 

 

The facts about the Crocodile attack from the Cruise Director and one of the divemasters.

 

[EDIT BY MODERATOR (AM)] - Apologies to Tony for merging the threads - this post was in the original thread directing readers to the new thread (which in now merged into this discussion). Ihave updated the link so it still takes you to Deb's comments (above in this thread).

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Deb

Thanks for the reporting what the Ondina reported to you. A friend and member of WP was also on this trip and emailed me as to what happened (since he was on the dinghy that picked up Daniel David as well) but I wanted him to post himself so it'd be first hand, which will be forthcoming once he travels home.

As for the "speculation" of killing the croc, Mark Erdmann of CI has already explained that matter in the other thread. I suggest you read that post (and the thread) since I never said the Ondina would do anything to the croc directly. It is clearly the local authorities (as Mark indicated) who would be responsible for that. I'm sorry if you misread my posts. I did apologize for the allusion that NGOs would be responsible though.

In your own words, you have said the croc will attack without provocation, when it's just being a predator. Local authorities may also think that and killing the croc is one possible outcome(in fact in many countries, they share that sentiment and do kill the crocs , even in a country where they are protected like Australia). This is not speculation as I know crocs have been killed in the Raja Empat area to protect the staff of certain businesses. My post was to make sure that the croc is protected, whose fate, as yet, is still undetermined.

With regards to the presence of crocs in Nampale, Kararu had already reported Lauren Greider's encounter (and pictures) in their Dec 08 newsletter. Other operators have spotted the croc before and shared the news. It's old news that there are crocs in Nampale. The fact is there are salties in quite a few places in the archipelago.

I am glad you think of your customer's safety first before photo ops. As always, there are various risks in this sport and divers have to assume responsibility for taking these risks, including DCS from unsafe diving and attacks from large predators in the wild.

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The crocodile that I saw was probably 10-12 feet long. It was missing it's right front hand. My vet looked at my photos and thought it might be female. The crew on the Cheng Ho saw it surface swim back to shore and "marked" the area for avoidance. We entered the water in a pretty area that I had dove before. There was a strong current and an outgoing tide so there was pretty poor vis. I blew past everyone I was diving with and just went with the current. It was not a pretty area, no coral on the roots and I was stalking archer fish when it entered the water. The photo pro, Steve, aboard the Cheng Ho, has been way back in the lakes and has found stirred up water. I definitely wouldn't go there!

 

The crocodile came after me, I shot four photos thinking that would irritate it and it would split and then swam like hell. I probably should have gone deep but my fear was that if he/she followed me that I'd be dealing with a deep attack and could risk getting bent. I surfaced only after I could no longer see it behind me. It did spot me in the channel though and then swam out to me. I held my strobe arm against its nose and it lifted its lips and did a little test bite of my strobe arms. I whistled non-stop with my Scubalert until the boat came to my rescue. I was wondering what I would do if it attacked me and am grateful it didn't. I am also glad that I saw the croc and that the 68 y/o woman snorkeler on our trip didn't. I had my camera and my ex-ER-nurse sense of adventure to protect me!

 

I would dive the area again but only with good lighting and visibility. I would stay with my same-day-same ocean buddy diving spouse and would only venture up the wide mouthed rivers. I think in the day time the crocks probably hang on the surface and would most likely be visible from a distance. Maybe the boats can stay in touch with each other on locations to avoid. The area looks like such a crocodile habitat that I am assuming they are everywhere.

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Thanks Lauren. I'd read about your encounter on the Kararu newsletter earlier this year. Sounds like an adventure you'd rather not repeat alone at least.

I guess new ground rules for diving in the area may be forthcoming with this incident.

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I just received an email from IUCNCSG, seems relocation would only be to farms or zoos. Looking at a Bali croc farm which officially closed years ago so the crocs are now eating themselves as they have been abandoned.

There has been a number of scientific studies here in Australia (both in Queensland and the Northern Territory), using satelite tracking devices on large crocodiles.

Evidence indicates that the crocodile returns to the same place that it was captured , even when relocated some hundreds of kms away.

 

I have also removed the petition aspect of the poll since this thread has drawn the interest of those with influence to the outcome of this particular croc.

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I was on the Ondina trip then this happened, moreover I was on one of two dinghies that picked up injured diver and his buddies. Here is my account of situation -

 

on Apr 13 myself and my buddy finished long relaxed afternoon dive in mangrove shallows and were picked up by dinghy. Just few seconds later our driver received call from boat asking to check urgently other group of divers - we noticed splashes few hundred meters away. Quickly arriving at the scene we found two divers on the surface in the state of serious panic, but we managed to understand that accident involving croc and third diver in the group just happened. In next few seconds we were thinking frantically that to do and my buddy even entered water (he was still with tank) for help - but looking at the faces and panic I really thought that something irreparable happened, it was scary. In few seconds another dinghy arrived, and then something miraculous happened - missing diver surfaced by himself, without mask and with bleeding neck. He was quickly taken on second dinghy and dinghy left to the boat. It was time then I noticed croc on the surface few meters away - he was frantically swimming into distance keeping his mouth open, I could not see much detail well due to contrast sunlight, but animal was huge - at least 3.5-4 meters long. Noticing this we quickly pulled people to the dinghy and collected two other divers groups in the mangroves. It all happened very quickly - between initial call and the moment we arrived to the boat just five minutes or less passed.

 

Injured diver was attended by one of the Ondina passengers who was doctor, he gave him oxygen, some strong painkiller drugs (valium I think) and started to put stiches on his hand and neck. Ondina crew reaction was very prompt and professional, about after 10-15 minutes after we arrived to the boat we were already sailing to the rendezvous point with speedboat called from one of the nearby villages - it took us about two hours to get there, injured diver and his friend were transferred to Sorong then - that took about 4-5 hours. Ondina crew used all means to make sure that evacuation happens as fast as possible, working frantically on satellite phone communication and boat departure.

 

Diver injured by croc and his buddy are very experienced divers whom dove many places and even have some technical diving background. They had no cameras with them on this trip. Later we found out that croc came out of nowhere, and grabbed diver from side, damaging his hand and neck and trying to pull victim to the deep place - typical behaviour. Buddy tried to fight croc with his hands (he had no knife in his disposal) and said that he poked an eye of croc with finger, but did not succeed and surfaced to call for help. Apparently croc finally released his hold then victim was able to reach his knife and stab eye with it. Another key factor to survival was that octopus of victim was fastened on his neck - he managed to grab even in this difficult situation and keep breathing. In my opinion it is miracle that diver survived and I attribute it to his bravery and ability to keep calm and disciplined in this extreme situation - perhaps most of us would not be able to deal with this situation in such cold-minded manner. I'm very glad and happy that he is ok and only serious injury is some muscle damage in hand that can be operated and fixed with no lasting effects.

 

I want to stress what only things I saw by myself from dinghy are to be treated as precise first-hand information - everything else is information I got from divers and crew in pretty hectic circumstances. I did not speak to victim of the attack by myself after accident, but had chance to talk to his buddy before he departed to Sorong. I'm very confident that there was no any kind of provocative behaviour against animal, since as I said above those divers are very experienced, mature and big nature lovers as well, I observed them underwater on other dives and their behaviour is impeccable. In my opinion it is unfortunate but very rare accident - and I think if croc like this is in mangroves it is best to catch and relocate it, since it already displayed offensive behaviour against people - or to close Misool mangroves for diving...

Edited by pats0n

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I read with great interest Deb's post (7:13 am on 21 April) on this forum, as I was the diver who suffered the attack.

 

While I laud her decision not to take divers to the site in question and her warning to other operators about the risks involved, her report of the accident contains serious errors.

 

Currently, I am in a Singapore hospital facing a fourth operation tomorrow. My energies must now be devoted to recovering from my injuries. I respectfully ask for your patience until I can make a proper statement.

Edited by raja.diver

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Thanks for posting personally Alex. I'm sure it was a not so nice experience to witness such a thing.

Relocation doesn't seem to work as I've stated before. However, I've just been put in touch with Dr Tommy Soehartono, who is the head of PHKA, the entity in charge of any decisions made regarding the croc and even closure of the area. The point is not to prevent a massive purge of crocs from the area. I personally hope they don't close the area and just warn people about the dangers. However, the operators may choose to avoid the area due to this incident..

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David

Thanks for coming onboard to answer the questions, but please take your time. Right now your recovery is of the utmost importance and the facts behind your incident can wait. I wish you a speedy recovery from your operation.

I would also like to apologize for calling you Daniel in my previous post. Brain fart after reading Deb's post.

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I guess one has to assume that such attacks are possible from this croc or others anywhere in the area.

The question then arises what decisions are taken and to what degree divers are informed and cautioned or prevented from diving in ANY area where these animals are known to exist.

.... Should diving be cautioned against in any area where there are crocs? I'm not suggesting one thing or another, I'd like to hear what others think.

 

Jeff, I personally think for a place like Indonesia where the crocs are spread out over the less densely populated and more remote islands with habitats suited for the crocs (estuarine, mangroves etc). It's impossible to foresee the presence of crocs much less if they'd attack.

Just last year in Papua Barat, we ran into a 4m buaya while doing a muck dive. It took off once we approached it underwater. Our DM refused to get in the water after that while all of us went back to look for it.

For all of us, getting in the water, there are many inherent risks and some risks are greater than others. Some of us would like to manage what is "acceptable risk". Crocs are dangerous and can kill. They are responsible for more deaths than sharks ever have been. There have been many cases where they've attacked scuba divers/snorkelers/swimmers and even surfers, most at the surface (I can think of one scuba diving attack in 2005 where the diver may have been underwater but that is unconfirmed.)

That said, I know quite a few people (myself included) who'd jump into the water with 4-5m nile crocs or salties. Mind you most of these guys do it as a profession. They know the risks and I would not call them brave nor silly, just people who accept the risks involved.

I think adults should make those decisions themselves. They should not be prevented from diving in the waters, but warnings for areas with crocs would be definitely helpful in guarding against attacks. That's my own personal view.

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I was on the Ondina trip also when the attack of the croc happened.

My name is Fernando Blanco, I.m doctor.

First I.d like to say hello Alex. I agree with you the most of you write here.

Is truth that diver attacked is a mature and serious diver and is sure he didn.t do anything wrong.

Ondina,s crew where helpfull in that situation.

But people must know that evacuation where very difficult and long.

Attack where at 4 or 5 p.m. 13th april but transfer to speed boat where at 3 a.m. next day. we must add

at least 3 more hours until to reach Sorong. This means more than 12 hours until he could be in the nearest

hospital in Sorong city ( poor hospital, I have to say ).

First speed boat they contact, said two hours after that they wanted triple amount of money. they where supposed on the route two hours ago, but when ondina called them again, they where still in Sorong.

They didn,t mind if somebody where injured or dead. They just wanted money.

That area is absolutelly remote, beautiful and solitary and is not the best place for dive with crocodiles

because of the difficult evacuation.

I.m against extermination of crocodiles there ( except maybe the agresor one )

but I advise against to dive there.

 

Regards from La Rioja, Spain

 

Fernando B.

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I was on the Ondina trip also when the attack of the croc happened.

My name is Fernando Blanco, I.m doctor.

First I.d like to say hello Alex. I agree with you the most of you write here.

Is truth that diver attacked is a mature and serious diver and is sure he didn.t do anything wrong.

Ondina,s crew where helpfull in that situation.

But people must know that evacuation where very difficult and long.

Attack where at 4 or 5 p.m. 13th april but transfer to speed boat where at 3 a.m. next day. we must add

at least 3 more hours until to reach Sorong. This means more than 12 hours until he could be in the nearest

hospital in Sorong city ( poor hospital, I have to say ).

First speed boat they contact, said two hours after that they wanted triple amount of money. they where supposed on the route two hours ago, but when ondina called them again, they where still in Sorong.

They didn,t mind if somebody where injured or dead. They just wanted money.

That area is absolutelly remote, beautiful and solitary and is not the best place for dive with crocodiles

because of the difficult evacuation.

I.m against extermination of crocodiles there ( except maybe the agresor one )

but I advise against to dive there.

 

Regards from La Rioja, Spain

 

Fernando B.

 

Fernando,

 

First of all - thank you for your help and professionalism - we were really lucky to have you on board, anyone of us could have needed your help. I'm sure that then it comes to evacuation details you have better knowledge then myself since you've been very close to your patient.

 

Cheers, Alex

Edited by pats0n

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Fernando

Thanks for coming and giving us vital information about the evac. I'm sure you wish your holiday was spent enjoying dives instead of sewing up David on the boat. But I'm very sure everyone is very grateful you were there. Did you accompany David all the way to Sorong? Did you disagree with the medical assessment at the hospital?

Yes, the area is very remote. As part of an emergency plan, I'd been looking at various airfields for the plane to land and people to get for medevac transport. The closest air medevac is in Manado. They could land in a private airfield on Seram. I know that Misool Eco Resort had a speed boat standing by to meet you guys as well. It's not cheap either so it's vital EVERYONE has medical evacuation insurance when diving in such an area.

THanks again.

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