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Can You Read This

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Hi

Thought this was pretty cool. :)

 

fi yuo cna

raed tihs, yuo hvae a sgtrane mnid too

 

Cna yuo raed tihs? Olny 55 plepoe

out of 100 can.

 

i cdnuolt blveiee taht I cluod aulaclty uesdnatnrd waht

I was rdanieg. The phaonmneal pweor of the hmuan mnid, aoccdrnig to a rscheearch

at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it dseno't mtaetr in waht oerdr the ltteres in a wrod

are, the olny iproamtnt tihng is taht the frsit and lsat ltteer be in the rghit

pclae. The rset can be a taotl mses and you can sitll raed it whotuit a pboerlm.

Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the

wrod as a wlohe. Azanmig huh? yaeh and I awlyas tghuhot slpeling was ipmorantt!

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Thanks guys,

Turns out after tow glasses of wien it makes perfcet senes. :) .

 

Steve

Edited by Steve Williams

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Interesting stuff indeed.

Now I know why my brain does not care about correct spelling. :)

 

After making some phonics programs, I just don't understand why they still teach kids the letter sounds and then confuse them later on and then have to re teach them with words like knife, school, phone etc. Just teach them the 44 sounds that make up all the words in the English language. Like f, ff and ph all make the same sound. They might get the spelling incorrect by using the wrong f, ff or ph sound but the can read the words.

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Actually, correct spelling means a great deal.

 

If you had not LEARNED the words and how they were spelled, you would not have progressed to the gestalt-recognition of the same letters in a somewhat-scrambled but still properly delimited (first and last) order.

 

This just shows that once a person has learned to read well, he is no longer parsing at the per-letter stage. Replace:

 

it dseno't mtaetr in waht oerdr the ltteres in a wrod are

 

With the equivalent trick, keeping first and last letters unchanged but making very near phonetic substitutions and word length changes by doubling or not doubling some letters (and I'll even not cheat, keeping my phonetic substitutions together like "uh" for a short e preceding an r):

 

it de'nzut mautr in wut oduhrr the lruhtes in a wred are

 

And you likely would not have gotten it without seeing the original. Of course the above example has lots of 2 to 3 word letters that don't change for syntax-recognition as well....a learned reader doesn't just comprehend at the per-word level but at the phrase and sentence-structure level as well. Which is why about the first things cryptologists do is break things into uniform size substructures (e.g. XXXXX XXXXX XXXXX XXXXX vs. XXX X XXXX XX XXXXXX) besides all the substitution games.

 

So spelling mattered - it trained you to recognize and parse language even when words are misspelled, not instead of having learned how to spell.

Edited by rtrski

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Was able to read it, though when my Aussie and UK friends (or my Canadian wife) spell words like colour or theatre I have no idea what they are trying to write...

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hsit wesheer ym eber ym dhsae noeg

 

vedi fesa

 

EandB

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hsit wesheer ym eber ym dhsae noeg

 

vedi fesa

 

EandB

 

Well you know boys are smarter than girls... :)

 

Dean what was that?

 

Wonder if it works for other languages?

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He forgot to use the golden rule of first and last letters. I can see 'beer' and 'gone' in that sentence though, so he may just have been drunk. You never know with Deano....

 

:)

 

Cheers, Simon

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I tnihk all tihs rsaerceh is a laod of old blolokc... :)

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Actually, correct spelling means a great deal.

 

If you had not LEARNED the words and how they were spelled, you would not have progressed to the gestalt-recognition of the same letters in a somewhat-scrambled but still properly delimited (first and last) order.

 

This just shows that once a person has learned to read well, he is no longer parsing at the per-letter stage. Replace:

 

it dseno't mtaetr in waht oerdr the ltteres in a wrod are

 

With the equivalent trick, keeping first and last letters unchanged but making very near phonetic substitutions and word length changes by doubling or not doubling some letters (and I'll even not cheat, keeping my phonetic substitutions together like "uh" for a short e preceding an r):

 

it de'nzut mautr in wut oduhrr the lruhtes in a wred are

 

And you likely would not have gotten it without seeing the original. Of course the above example has lots of 2 to 3 word letters that don't change for syntax-recognition as well....a learned reader doesn't just comprehend at the per-word level but at the phrase and sentence-structure level as well. Which is why about the first things cryptologists do is break things into uniform size substructures (e.g. XXXXX XXXXX XXXXX XXXXX vs. XXX X XXXX XX XXXXXX) besides all the substitution games.

 

So spelling mattered - it trained you to recognize and parse language even when words are misspelled, not instead of having learned how to spell.

 

 

I totally agree with this.

 

I'm dyslexic and mildly stupid :) It took me some time to grasp certain parts of the English Language as a kid, and i still struggle with some of it today. However i can tell when something that i've written isn't right, and it bugs me to the point that I'm starting to think I'm a pedant.

 

Forum Speak and MSN are full of spelling errors and it doesn't really matter, but there's nothing more annoying than an official communication between two Native English speakers that's riddled with errors that would be picked up by spell check! (Cue me making many errors in all my work email for the next 2 weeks!).

 

Although, that's not to say that people who mis-spell things aren't smart - i guess everyone's brains are wired differently! :) Just look at Dean, a complete muppet but 'teh' BBC have seen his value :)

 

In Indonesia the locals like to drop all the vowels out of words during text messaging, it sure makes things difficult!

 

Does anyone else speaking a foreign language on a daily basis feel their native tongue is in decline?

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This is a wonderful. The things mentioned are unanimous and needs to be appreciated by everyone.

 

really a good job.....turnd my girl friend on  :)

 

LENOX

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Parking Sensor

 

All I can say is that I wish I'd had one of those Backup Sensors when I owned a Minivan. It would have saved me a lot of money on the deductible on my auto insurance :)

 

Trying to backup safely while driving a minivan is nearly impossible I found out the hard way :)

 

But, alas, I drive a Honda Accord now so that Parking Sensor you're linking to would be useless.

 

Ellen

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Although, that's not to say that people who mis-spell things aren't smart - i guess everyone's brains are wired differently! :P Just look at Dean, a complete muppet but 'teh' BBC have seen his value :)

 

Awww you gotta a problem big lad... Get over it... :)

 

Dive safe

 

DeanB

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what if i can read those garbled words faster and comprehend more?

 

seriously, i have a problem reading. and i hate reading. but i read forums, reviews, technical docs, all day and night. i can't read novels. i often swap word order, even words from a couple lines later. i think this is laziness or impatience related.

 

but i'm pretty sure i was able to read that post faster than normal. and because the words didn't pop out at me, i was able to follow without reordering.

 

maybe i will develop software to garble the words of novels for me. maybe this can be a workaround for my reading. side effects? instant messaging ruined my spelling a long time ago!

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