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Aqua_soul

Some bubbeling and pitting on housing

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Hi

 

Been using my housing for +/- a year and noticed some bubbeling and pitting which concerns me. All the bubbeling and pitting is only to be found on the one half of the housing. (the back half).

This is my first aluminium housing and would like to know if I have reason to be concearned or is this par for the course as far as aluminium housings are concerned?

 

I take extremely good care of all my gear. On each dive I spray all my gear with fresh water straight after the dive and then soak it for a few hours in luke warm water once i get home.

 

Here is a few photos showing the defects.

 

4836860027_1f6788fd66_b.jpg

 

4837471236_1d5530cd46_b.jpg

 

4836858495_c971005ce6_b.jpg

 

4836855949_0f1a7b6965_b.jpg

 

4836854881_b1660ba8b9_b.jpg

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do both halves of your housing have zincs on them? it sounds like there is only a zinc on the front half and not the back half. A zinc is a "sacrificial" metal that will corrode faster than the aluminum and therefore it corrodes instead of the aluminum as long as they are touching each other. As the housing has a rubber seal then the two halves of the housing don't actually touch each other so the zinc would only protect the one side. If there is no zinc on the back of your housing i would recommend trying to retrofit one on there.

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Hi

 

Been using my housing for +/- a year and noticed some bubbeling and pitting which concerns me. All the bubbeling and pitting is only to be found on the one half of the housing. (the back half).

This is my first aluminium housing and would like to know if I have reason to be concearned or is this par for the course as far as aluminium housings are concerned?

 

I take extremely good care of all my gear. On each dive I spray all my gear with fresh water straight after the dive and then soak it for a few hours in luke warm water once i get home.

 

Yes, that's normal if the integrity of the coating is breached. Mike is likely right on about using Zn (source: a marine supply store). You can remove the corrosion and recoat the housing with emamel paint or Al "blueing" (gun supply store) depending on how your housing is coated.

Bob

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Ideally the camera should be totally isolated from the housing material to prevent/minimize electrolysis issues. If the body mounts on a metal base plate, cover the plate with a non-conductive material like electrical tape. If it attaches to the plate with a metal thumb screw inserted in the tripod hole this can also cause electrolysis problems. Some use a nylon/delrin thumb screw. Stainless strobe connectors attached to aluminum bulkheads are also a concern. Minimize dissimilar materials when electrical current (however small) is involved.

Edited by jcclink

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Agree w/ all that has been said. After you have coating breakdown (the coating is the first line of defense) then the aluminum can turn into aluminum oxide (the white powdery stuff). I would start by treating the corrosion spots w/ acid and then coating w/ enamel as stated above. Also have a look at attaching mg or zn anodes somewhere on the housing.

 

Cheers

James

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This does look like electrolytic corrosion to me (as has been already stated) too. You DO need to find the source and stop it or it will probably continue - zinc anodes may help reduce the problem but whatever is causing it needs to be sorted out. I notice that some of the problem areas are near screws - if they are plated screws you may simply have a poor screw fitted which has insufficient plating on it, or has not had a screw locking compound applied sufficiently. It would be helpful to see the entire housing as you set it up and use it to try to suggest other possible causes. It is not par for the course on an aluminium housing and you should be able to stop it as well as rectifying the existent damage as James suggests.

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What strobes are you using? When I used Ike Ai/A100 on my old rig, I had some corrsion issues. It seems that those units ground through the housing body. Zn did help reduce this problem. I now use optical connects and do not have this problem. Any contact from dissimilar metals can cause this. Zn is more reactive than Al, so it takes the hit.

Bob

Edited by Deep6

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I am sceptical to be honest - just not convinced that an average housing can spend sufficient time in water to start to corrode in this way, similarly I can't see zinc anodes doing much.

 

I was involved in a boat where the owner had wired the prop shaft to the positive side of the battery and the negative to the engine - yea it pitted up the shaft and sterngear pretty well - but it took months and months.

 

While ally is more reactive there should be significantly smaller potentials involved here.

 

Just not convinced.

 

Paul C

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Thanks so much all for the insightful and helpful information.

 

I will take a photo of the complete setup soon and post it.

I use Inon Z240 strobes, connected via fibre optics.

 

Will need to take a in depth look, but I can't see any zinc on the housing as it is. Where will I likely find zinc which has been fixed to the housing?

 

What acid should I use to clean these areas?

Deep6, how can I find out if I need enamel painting or Al "blueing", ie. how do i determine what coating was used on the housing? (other than the obvious of contacting the manufacturer:))

 

The baseplate is metal and I will cover it with electrical tape.

Its a compact housing so its likely that the little triangles the camera strap fits through also touch the housing, so i will wrap these as well.

 

Don't know how to determine if the screw(s) were badly plated or too little locking compound has been used. If I would want to buy locking compound, what should I be looking for?

 

I have also forward these pictures to the manufacturer and truly hope the source and solution will be found!

 

Again, thanks a lot so far!

 

Geo

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Deep6, how can I find out if I need enamel painting or Al "blueing", ie. how do i determine what coating was used on the housing? (other than the obvious of contacting the manufacturer:))

Geo

 

I use 00 or 000 steel wool and "elbow grease" to remove corrsion followed by an alcohol - cotton swab cleaning. If your housing has an anonized Al finish, try Al Black compound (store that handles firearm cleaning supplies). If you housing is painted, get a matching color enamel paint from a hobby supply store. You can use enamel paint over enamel & other types of paint, but not visa versa.

 

I am sceptical to be honest - just not convinced that an average housing can spend sufficient time in water to start to corrode in this way, similarly I can't see zinc anodes doing much.

Paul C

 

 

“When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.”

Sherlock Holmes from “The Sign of Four”

 

A little tongue in cheek there Paul; no offense intended.

Bob

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All controls should have a rubber/vinyl cover over the end of shaft/control arm to avoid metal to metal contact between housing & camera. All fasteners should be stainless, not plated steel. Since you're using fiber optic cables the problem must be with housing/camera, or housing materials not well suited for marine use (less likely). Take a good look at camera installation interface. From personal experience, if electrolysis is the issue, it may only take a few days of use to start seeing the start of bubbling, pitting, etc. If you're using a metal thumb screw to attach body, wrap the threads with teflon tape to help insulate.

Edited by jcclink

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All controls should have a rubber/vinyl cover over the end of shaft/control arm to avoid metal to metal contact between housing & camera. All fasteners should be stainless, not plated steel. Since you're using fiber optic cables the problem must be with housing/camera, or housing materials not well suited for marine use (less likely). Take a good look at camera installation interface. From personal experience, if electrolysis is the issue, it may only take a few days of use to start seeing the start of bubbling, pitting, etc. If you're using a metal thumb screw to attach body, wrap the threads with teflon tape to help insulate.

A_S,

I see from your profile that you have the Seatool housing for the D300. I am jealous! It is anodized, but I don't know if it is also painted. I suggest you contact your Seatool distributor before attacking the corroded spots.

Bob

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Just not convinced.

 

Paul C

Well Paul

 

I AM! I've seen aggressive electrolytic corrosion cause pitting surprisingly quickly. It depends on the metals are used in combination and what potential differences are involved. It can be a real problem and has caused some manufacturers to change components or recommend against specific combinations of equipment. I remember removing an alloy control shaft from one housing many years ago and be able to snap it between two fingers - the whole shaft was brittle and powdery. Most manufacturers are careful these days and use a minimal of different metals or heavy, hard and durable anodisation or thick epoxy paint coatings, but I still see examples of chrome plated brass bolts used, poor or inappropriate anodisation, and inadequate paint use. Sometimes its a trade off. 'Marine grade' 316 stainless is pretty resistant to rusting but some dive knives (like mine) are made from (I think) 312 because unlike 316 it will keep an edge.

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Aqua_Soul,

 

It is difficult to determine the root cause(s) of degraded metals without actually inspecting, testing and evaluating the components; however, as you can tell, that doesn't stop many of us from trying. Metal failure occurs predominately through corrosion, fracture and wear. In my opinion, corrosion is misunderstood more than other forms of materials degradation. Assuming that your problem is pitting due to exposure in marine environment(s), I am fairly comfortable with and confident in the following comments/questions/suggestions:

 

1. I agree with Bob's comment above. Have you asked the manufacturer-of-the-housing if they know of similar problems with their product(s) and if they are will to evaluate... with hopes that they will repair or even replace?

2. You might consider visiting corrosion forums for further input...MarineCorrosion.org out of the UK is a good source but often very technical.

3. Generally, I would recommend you take action very carefully after weighing your options. It would be relatively easy to damage the housing well beyond its current state.

4. Based upon the limited information gleaned from your posts and observation of your photos, I would recommend the following:

a. Do not try to "locally" anodize the housing unless you are comfortable doing so and/or you solicit help from someone who is. It's not simply a matter of cleaning out dirt, debris and corrosion products followed by local application of an acid. Anodization is an electrochemical process. There are different types of anodized coatings and they are produced primarily by two methods: chromic acid and sulfuric acid. They produce a relatively thick, tenatious oxide layer that protects the underlaying base metal, aluminum alloy in this case. In my opinion, if re-anodizing is required, you need to match the process that was used originally and blend in a manner that you don't disrupt regions adjacent to the pits. Areas that presumably have retained integrity of the anodized layer.

b. Initially, I would not add sacrificial anode(s). They are relatively easy to install but care must be exercised to prevent other problems (e.g coating disbondment at the point of attachment, etc.). Furthermore, they only preclude corrosion during immersion. Most of us expose our housings to "alternate immersion" service. Consequently, even if the housing is protected via sacrificial anode, pitting can/will proceed while the housing is in spray-and-splash or even marine atmospheric conditions (like one often experiences on the deck of a boat even if you fresh-water rinse upon surfacing). Above the water's surface, a sacrificial anode can only protect the basemetal for a distance of approximately 1/4" (6mm)--radial distance from the perimeter of the anode. If you do pursue the sacrificial anode route, I would recommend zinc over magnesium (advantages include less probability of coating damage and lower consumption rate of anode itself).

c. Initially, I would focus on locally cleaning the pitted areas followed by an organic coating. Ideally, you'll want to use a system similar to your original coating whether it be enamel, epoxy, etc. Unfortunately I can't provide a specific cleaning procedure but I suspect there are many reliable solutions available online. I would suggest you only clean to the degree necessary (remove debris and any white powdery corrosion product). Should not rely solely on the unaided eye but rather use a magnifying glass or microscope at low power.

d. If "c" above does not mitigate the pitting then you may need to proceed to anodizing and/or installing a sacrificial anode(s)

e. Again, whatever actions you take you obviously want to make sure you do not do "more harm than good". If repairs are not done properly, you can aggrevate the surface and accelerate attack at/near the existing pits or elsewhere.

 

As for the cause of your pitting problem, there are several possibilities. I can't say with a high degree of confidence; however, I will provide the following comments:

 

--it is likely that you had defect(s) in your original coating system. Organic coatings (paint) often have "holidays" even if applied correctly. For aluminum housings, the below laying anodized layer is the next line of protection from pitting and other forms of corrosion. Without a painted overcoat, the relatively brittle, anodized layer can be damaged, mechanically in a variety of ways which provides a path for pitting of the basemetal (typically due to crevice corrosion via a "differential oxygen cell" mechanism).

--although less likely, you may have had a housing with some form of surface metallurgical defects (e.g. shrinkage porosity, gas porosity, non-metallic inclusions, etc.) In this case, the defects may have precluded the expected protection from anodizing and coating.

--also possible but not probable (and you are in the best position to know this) is that the housing experienced some very fine mechanical damage (hitting edges, sharp pointy object striking the housing, etc.

-- Pitting (particularly when crevice corrosion is an issue) can occur very quickly with passive film former (e.g. aluminum alloys, stainless steel alloys, etc.); however, depending upon the residual thickness of your base-metal, specific location of the pits, etc. your damage may not be urgently significant. Again, unless you go about repairs methodically and with care you could cause more harm than good.

--The role of dissimilar metals in your problem is easy to overstate. Aluminum and Stainless Steel are often successfully used in combination for Marine service regardless of the specific stainless steel alloy. The potential difference (driving force for dissimilar metal corrosion, a.k.a. "galvanic corrosion") of aluminum and stainless steel is typically acceptable particularly when the stainless steel component is small relative to the aluminum component (as is the case with most UW housings). The reasons include (a) a favorable anode/cathode ratio and (b) a phenomenon known as polarization...I will not get into this topics unless you are interested:)

--The role of stray-currents (the often used term, Electrolysis, is a bit of misnomer and erroneously used even by chemists, metallurgists, etc.--rarely does the corrosion engineer talk in terms of "electrolysis"), is unlikely for your problem.

 

Sorry for the long-winded response...please let me know if you would like further input...Good Luck!

 

Scott

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Pitting on aluminium underwater camera housings produces a whitish corrosion product which is porous. After its been in salt water it will almost certainly retain some salt regardless of how well its washed. This salt is deliquescent (it absorbs water from the atmosphere) and will make the pitting damp so that further corrosion WILL take place. As has been said above try the supplier/manufacturer first, but if they can't or don't deal with it you really should not just leave it - 4c in the last post is good advice - but you need to paint it well after cleaning and then keep a good eye on the area in future - aluminium requires a bonding primer too.

 

When I supply Seacam housings they are supplied with a bottle of oil which is designed to coat any damaged areas of the hard (Eloxal - chromate?) anodisation and prevent corrosion - this seems to work very well if used appropriately, although I am unsure as to exactly how (whether the oil has a affinity for the aluminium or whatever) but it does seem to work - the only problem being that if such a oil was used on a painted housing it could not then be painted in future.

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wow, great information Scott, thanks for posting that.

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Paul: yep, Seacam uses Eloxal coating - a kind of anodization process that uses oxalic acid. It's the best coating system I've used - it's extremely tough and it's clear which I like.

 

Cheers

James

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Something very similar happened with my Subal ND2 about three years ago, but I had to stop using mine since some of the corrosion showed up on the o-ring seal area. I sent the housing back to Subal via Reef Photo and they fixed with no charges. They seemed puzzled about it and assured me they never saw it in any other of their housings.

 

Anyhow, after they fixed it I used my housing extensively and there are no signs of corrosion any more...

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Hi Scott,

 

No apologies needed, that was an excellent post and you managed to explain some very technical information in a very understandable way!

 

I still need to take photos of my complete setup, but when that is view one will see the overall condition of my housing and how well it has been looked after. Hitting/damaging of the housing can be ruled out.

 

From your info, I am certainly not doing anything until I have heard from my supplier who has contacted the manufacturer. (I didn't wanted to name the manufacturer as I am not trying to bad mouth them, after all they still have to reply) But I must say, reading just how complex a solution this might require, I do think, its something they should be taking care of.

 

As stayed my reason for posting here was jus to get an idea if this is normal or not, so at least I have some background when I receive their reply.

 

I will post the photos of the complete setup in the next two days and also update once I receive feedback from the manufacturer.

 

Cheers

Geo

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Needing to left of some steam!

 

I received just now some feedback from Fisheye. (I have a Seatool Housing for those which didn't noticed)

 

Here is there reply:

 

"Our technical staffs verified that electrical erosion occurred at his housing.

 

He must attach a kind of holder which is made of brass for example to the housing to hold it.

 

Please inform him to remove any metal stuff from his housing if he still keep any.

 

We don't think that is defective housing.

 

So would you mind if you gently explain him what is happenning with his housing?

 

As we see his photo, that is still ok to use."

 

To say that I am displeased with this response is putting it mildly. What on earth are they thinking to suggest I must have a brass holder made for my camera. (I am the user not the housing designer/engineer/manufacturer)

"Gently explain him what is happening with his housing" NO how about gentley explaining to me how you will be fixing a problem with product you have manufactured!

And although the housing is not flooding at the moment and its ok to use, must I wait until it have deteriorate so much that it fails to fullfill its function before they will come to the party with a solution.

 

I do think I am a reasonable person and mild mannered, but this response did not sit well with me. I truly hope Fisheye will provide better support soon!

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Aqua Soul, your dealer was probably not suppose to show you the email from Japan, which I assume is not written by a native writer of english.

 

Unfortunately, the process of elimination from a manufacturer's POV is to assume that their product is sound and it's the user. It's not always the best way to deal with things but that's the way it usually is. There will be a bit of ping pong because they have to identify cause from that POV. So you will have to explain to them whether you do use a brass or other kinds of metal attachments. Then when they eliminate that, they'll work on other stuff. You may have to send the housing back to Japan for evaluation in the end. Not much point of getting angry yet because they are trying to eliminate causes.

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Not much point of getting angry yet because they are trying to eliminate causes.

Hmm, don't get mad, just get even. Drew has a point; it sometimes takes persistence to get results in a dispute. Hang in there and reply to their request. Good luck or should I say, make your own luck.

Bob

 

OBTW: Inon's GF1 housing has

 

■ Corrosion Suppression Unit

 

Optional replacement unit when pre-installed unit gets worn. The unit suppresses housing corrosion by oxidizing before the X-2 housing body gets rusted

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Hi Drew, what is the reason why the dealer can't forward me what was discussed between him and the manufacturer?

From further mails between me and the dealer, it was mentioned that in fact what I received was an interpretation of the reply from the manufacturer to the dealer.

 

Okay from the your and Deep6 reply, it would seem I have misinterpreted the e-mail. My understanding was that the manufacturer was advicing me to have a brass holder made. If in fact they were trying to determine if I was attaching brass to the housing, as per your insite, them I am feeling better.

 

Thanks for the support/insite.

 

Geo

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If in fact they were trying to determine if I was attaching brass to the housing, as per your insite, them I am feeling better.

My interpretation of the information that you posted is that the manufacturer thinks that you have attached something made of metal to the housing and that this is the cause of the problem. They clearly consider brass to be the most likely culprit, hence why they ask that anything fitted which is made of brass should be removed. If you haven't fitted anything made of metal to the housing then you should tell them this straight away and see what their response is, because it is clear that they think that you have 'electrical erosion' (which I would consider should be referred to as electolytic corrosion, although this may also be an inaccurate label as others have commented) and that they think that the cause is the use/addition of an incorrect metal somewhere.

 

FYI odd things can happen, for example I have come across metal flash socket plug caps which caused similar problems, not to the flash socket but to the surrounding area of the housing - this was dealt with by simply fitting plastic plug caps - so make sure that there is nothing on the housing which has not been supplied by the manufacturer, and if there is remove it and check with the manufacturer whether this could be the cause. I am sure that if you have used anything not supplied by the manufacturer then they will want to know so that they can advise against its use in future.

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It’s been a while, but I can now provide some feedback. My aim with this post is not to name and shame and I really wish the report could have been completely positive. However, all in all the exercise was not a positive experience and I do think it’s important to share this experience with the market. For most people, an underwater housing is an expensive item to buy and in IMHO one would expect top notch back-up service when required.

 

Another reasons for my post is, as this is my first aluminium housing and only has had exposure to one manufacturer, namely Seatool, I would greatly appreciate to receive feedback as to if my expectations/standards are too high or if I have good reason to feel negative about the service received.

To aid this I have included a number of post repair photos.

 

I did informed Fisheye and Seatool that I will be placing a review of my experience on public forums and I will be forwarding them the link, so they will be able to respond if so desired.

In August last year I returned the housing to the dealer. (Joe from Fun-in Taiwan) He in return forwarded the housing to Seatool. After a substantial delay and a couple of e-mails, the feedback came that Seatool would repair the housing and what the cost would be. It was state that the dealer will cover 50% of the cost and the manufacturer the other 50%. (Later I learned that this 50% was covered by Fisheye which is not the manufacturer) It was state that the reason for the delay was because this was the first time Seatool have seen a housing which deteriorated like mine and that they needed time to figure out what to do.

 

Once I got the mail that they will repair the housing, I immediately replied requesting to know exactly what and how they will be doing this. I simply received a reply that they will be doing a professional job and it will look just like a new housing.

 

Not my fight to fought, but I also asked the dealer why he had to cover 50% of the repair cost. To me the problems experienced with the housing are directly related to a manufacturing default. The response was that it’s not worth the effort for him to fight with Seatool and he will simply pay the 50%.

 

I also asked that Seatool must take photos of the repaired housing before shipping it back to the dealer, so I could obviously see what the repairs look like and either agree or disagree with what has been done. This never materialized and I was once again reassured that Seatool will be doing a professional job and it will look as good as new.

 

The period before the housing was received back by the dealer also took a substantial time. I foolishly interpreted this to be due to a thorough and professional job being done. I imagined the housing being stripped completely, removing the existing finishing layer, inspecting and testing the raw aluminium for defects, check that all screws used are of the required specification to be use in underwater housings, that sufficient screw compound has been used with all screws, repairing the defects to the claimed just as new condition, apply new finishing layer and reassemble.

The reason why I think the detail process described above should have been used is because it’s clear that something out of the ordinary caused the defects...after all, even the manufacturer reported that this was a first for them. (It’s important to remember that the deterioration didn’t happen because the protective layer was compromised, but that it happened below the protective layer and then bubble the finishing layer)

 

Once the housing was back at the dealer, I was informed that it will be ship back to me the following day. Again I requested to first see photos of the housing. I was told that the housing looks like new and that Seatool have done a great job.

 

I strongly disagreed with this once I received the housing back and could view it myself. (Looking at the photographic evidence, I think it would be hard to argue that the housing was in a state as good as new.) I e-mailed Joe as soon as possible with the photos why I am not happy. He promised me he forward my mail to Seatool. Some days past without any reply. I follow up, still no luck and so it went on for a while until Joe advice me to e-mail Seatool directly.

 

After my mail to Seatool, there again was a long wait and finally Mr. Kaz Okada (International Sales Fisheye) replied to my mail. After that a few mails were exchanged between the two of us. One of the things he did during our communication was to explain to me the Fisheye/Seatool relationship. Basically Fisheye introduced Seatool (now known as Recsea) to the international market. So they act as spoke person, the reason why Mr. Kaz Okada replied to my mail, but AND it’s a big but, Fisheye has no authority over Seatool/Recsea. This sadly is a recipe for public relationship disaster because the customer can find himself in a horrible passing the bucket scenario in the blink of an eye. (Thinking about it now, it does not make sense to me why Fisheye paid the other 50% of the repair cost if they have no say in Seatool.)

 

I felt that Mr. Okada tried to help me and I do think, should the housing been manufacturer by Fisheye or if Fisheye had a say in Seatool, the situation would have been resolved by now.

But Fisheye has no say in Seatool and after a while Mr Okada adviced me to e-mail Seatool directly. (I think they were actually ignoring his request as well) That I did, but yet have to receive a single piece of communication from Seatool. So the bottom line is, I am still at square one and the manufacturer and only entity who can resolve the issue is completely ignoring me. I think it’s completely unacceptable that a company completely ignore a person who has bought one of their products. Just think about it, if you buy something as simple as a packed of sweets and the sweets are off, you can return it to the manufacturer and be sure they will resolve the issue, how much more should this not be relevant for an expensive item such as a housing?

From the photos attached I think most will agree with me that the level of workmanship related to the repairs fall far short from what one would expect from a professional operation. Man I have seen backyard mechanics take rust out of vehicles much neater than this! Why it took them almost two months to “repair” the housing is beyond me. The job they did could not have taken more than two days!

 

Further the housing returned with quite a few scratches to it which it didn’t have prior to sending it off.

 

The cherry on top for me was the finger prints left in the polycarbonate viewing panels. Yes you read correctly, left in, because a person who has handled the housing during the repairs had some chemical on his/her fingers and their finger prints are actually burned into the viewing panels. I mean really, if they had any self respect, Seatool would have waist no time to get back to me to short out this horrible mistake by one of their employees out. (Just had a look on their website and the display in big – MADE IN JAPAN – its so sad even a company utilize a notion like that and then don’t do it justices!!!)

 

To summarize:

 

Will I make use of Fun-in in the future?

 

Yes they will remain on my short list in spite of clearly different understandings of the phrase “as good as new”. In future I would demand photos of the actually product and if that can’t be supplied then there would be no deal.

 

My opinion of Fisheye:

 

I truly feel that if the housing was manufactured by Fisheye the out come would have been completely different. Mr. Okada came across sincere in his effort to try and resolve this issue, but in the end it was of no use as Fisheye has no authority over Seatool.

 

I do think it’s a sad state and would recommend to other buyers to establish who has what power when you look at buying housing. Mail the manufacturer directly and see if you get any response. If they fail you, then most likely they fail you when you need them! It’s one thing to introduce a company internationally, but if the company introduced has no intention to provide proper back-up service to these new markets, then its senseless to buy from them.

 

My opinion of Seatool:

 

Well I guess it’s not hard to imagine that I don’t have a good word for them. Its mind blowing to me, how a company can simply choose to ignore a customer when they so clearly have been in the wrong. In spite of having bought the Seatool housing for specifics features, I will most certainly not look at that brand for my next housing if the current situation remains the same. Luckily other manufacturers now offer housings with similar features as what made me choose the Seatool housing. So I won’t be losing out on those features and can only think that the level of back-up service will be light years ahead. I would most certainly not consider recommending Seatool as an option to any buyer. I do hope that this writing will deter people in the market for an underwater housing to go with Seatool until such time that they have sorted out their complete lack of communication and improve their level of workmanship to what can be classified as professional.

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