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cdoyal

Cataract surgery and viewfinders

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I recently had cataract surgery in both eyes and as a result, have lost all my mid and close vision. I wear progressive lens glasses and that's fine for topside, but am struggling with the camera. I've tried split lenses in my mask but it's hard for me to look through the viewfinder with just the bottom half of the lens. I can't wear soft contacts because of astigmatism in both eyes. So I'm wondering if anyone else out there has had cataract surgery and how they are handling this problem.

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I recently had cataract surgery in both eyes and as a result, have lost all my mid and close vision. I wear progressive lens glasses and that's fine for topside, but am struggling with the camera. I've tried split lenses in my mask but it's hard for me to look through the viewfinder with just the bottom half of the lens. I can't wear soft contacts because of astigmatism in both eyes. So I'm wondering if anyone else out there has had cataract surgery and how they are handling this problem.

Not sure I understand the problem about looking through the viewfinder with the bottom part of you lens. I have progressive lenses for both topside and in my dive mask and I look through the viewfinder with my distance focus part of my lens (the top). Is it a mid vision problem, if so you might try monovision, with your dominant eye prescription for looking through the viewfinder.

Bill

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Not sure I understand the problem about looking through the viewfinder with the bottom part of you lens. I have progressive lenses for both topside and in my dive mask and I look through the viewfinder with my distance focus part of my lens (the top). Is it a mid vision problem, if so you might try monovision, with your dominant eye prescription for looking through the viewfinder.

Bill

 

Yes, it's more of a mid vision thing for the viewfinder but near vision for things like depth gauge, monitor back on the video housing, etc.

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I have monovision with that kind of surgery (one eye set to closeup and the other set to far vision), and it works fine after your brain does a bit of adjusting.

 

If both eyes are set to farsight, I think you could replicate it by having one eyepiece on your mask fitted with a lens for closeup and using the other unadjusted for your viewfinder.

 

Otara

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I recently had cataract surgery in both eyes and as a result, have lost all my mid and close vision. I wear progressive lens glasses and that's fine for topside, but am struggling with the camera. I've tried split lenses in my mask but it's hard for me to look through the viewfinder with just the bottom half of the lens. I can't wear soft contacts because of astigmatism in both eyes. So I'm wondering if anyone else out there has had cataract surgery and how they are handling this problem.

 

If your distance vision is good without correction the camera should work fine (looking through the viewfinder), simply adjust the diopter power on the viewfinder. This would be no different from any presbyope (loss of near vision with age). Is your distance vision good without glasses?

 

There are soft contact lenses that correct for astigmatism.

 

(If you are looking at an LCD screen this is a different matter and where your loss of mid and near vision comes into play underwater)

 

I'd need a bit more information to ferret out your visual problem. If you have, say, 20/20 vision (or close) at a distance without glasses a camera viewfinder shouldn't be a problem.

 

Steve (MD - ophthalmologist)

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I have had the same surgery and use a contact in one eye for distance and the other eye for closeup and looking into the viewfinder using the cameras +/- diopter to get proper focus. Works well for me.

 

Phil Rudin

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If your distance vision is good without correction the camera should work fine (looking through the viewfinder), simply adjust the diopter power on the viewfinder. This would be no different from any presbyope (loss of near vision with age). Is your distance vision good without glasses?

 

There are soft contact lenses that correct for astigmatism.

 

(If you are looking at an LCD screen this is a different matter and where your loss of mid and near vision comes into play underwater)

 

I'd need a bit more information to ferret out your visual problem. If you have, say, 20/20 vision (or close) at a distance without glasses a camera viewfinder shouldn't be a problem.

 

Steve (MD - ophthalmologist)

 

Steve-

I'm 20/30 in both eyes without glasses but have -.75 and -1.25 astigmatism. I was very nearsighted (-18) in both eyes before the surgery so I'm thrilled now. I'm thinking that a combination of an Inon viewfinder and a mask with +2 bifocals in it might do the trick. I'll just have to live with less than ideal distance vision.

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Steve-

I'm 20/30 in both eyes without glasses but have -.75 and -1.25 astigmatism. I was very nearsighted (-18) in both eyes before the surgery so I'm thrilled now. I'm thinking that a combination of an Inon viewfinder and a mask with +2 bifocals in it might do the trick. I'll just have to live with less than ideal distance vision.

 

-18.00. Yow. I'm a minus 9 so I can sympathize with you and the happiest patients are folk like you and me. Nice to get out of bed in the morning without glasses, eh. AND, just for fun, there is a connection between high myopia and high IQ. :)

 

Anyhow, theoretically you should be able to adjust the focus part of the viewfinder and see everything in the viewfinder pretty well. I assume you have tried that. If so, I'm not quite sure why that isn't working. The astigmatism could be corrected in a lens in the mask with a bifocal in one eye if you wish.

 

Steve

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I have had the same surgery and use a contact in one eye for distance and the other eye for closeup and looking into the viewfinder using the cameras +/- diopter to get proper focus. Works well for me.

 

Phil Rudin

 

Hi Phil,

 

Have you had any problems with salt water getting under the contact lens and causing irritation? I have reached a stage where I can hardly read my camera or gauges just thru my mask so I'm researching solutions. The magnification of the mask seems to compensate for my mild astigmitism and myopia when viewing distant objects underwater.

 

I have dry eyes so am not a candidate for Lasik. Anyone else can chime in here too.

 

Regards,

Scott

Edited by Scubaskeeter

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I dive with soft lenses all the time, at least for the last 10 years, I used Torics for astigmatism, then now as my eyes changed, I'm using spherical soft lenses. never had a problem, your tears are basically salt water too, just different concentrations, no difference with salt water being in direct contact with your eye, just blink and it'll get squeezed out. If you get water in your mask all the time, it's a matter of getting a better fitting mask. Most big viewfinders allow for diopter adjustments if required.

 

S.

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I'd need a bit more information to ferret out your visual problem. If you have, say, 20/20 vision (or close) at a distance without glasses a camera viewfinder shouldn't be a problem.

 

Steve (MD - ophthalmologist)

 

Hi Steve,

 

I have sent you a private message about an eye problem of my own....sorry for intruding on you thread cdoyal...

 

Cheers,

John

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I use the one day acuvue type lenses and offen wear them for more than a day. If I do two weeks of three or four dives a day I find myself making a change more offen but for the most part one day of diving is not a problem for me.

 

Phil Rudin

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Thanks for the replies, Phil and everyone. I will ask my ophthalmologist if I can use the soft lenses. That sound a lot easier than getting a new hard lens in a mask!

Edited by Scubaskeeter

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