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yakimadiver

Which macro lens for a Canon 300d?

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I'm planning on using the Ikelite housing for my 300d and need help choosing which macro lens is best, the ef 100 or the ef 50? With the 50, I would only need to get the dome port. Thanks. :rolleyes:

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Hi Yakimadiver,

 

With the 50, I would only need to get the dome port.

 

Why do you think that? The 50 will give a higher magnification result when shot behind a flat port.

 

I would start with the 50mm. It is a very versatile and forgiving lens. It's also a lot easier to shoot in AF.

 

Cheers

James

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What other lenses do you already have? If you're coming from the P&S world and don't have much experience with SLRs in general, or are used to a P&S digital, I'd agree with James, get the 50mm to start.

 

I'd also suggest you get a flat port for the 50mm as well. Last I checked, flat ports for Ikelite were around $140 at B&H, which is cheap compared to every other housing vendor that I can think of.

 

Just a thought...

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Thanks for the advice. I am new to the SLR world. I am now using a G2 with an ikelite housing and d125 substrobes. I am just getting started with my lens collection and only have the kit lens and a Canon 55-200 ef II zoom.

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I'm planning on using the Ikelite housing for my 300d and need help choosing which macro lens is best, the ef 100 or the ef 50? With the 50, I would only need to get the dome port. Thanks. :rolleyes:

I have noth the 100mm and the 50. The 100mm sees about 10x as much use as the 50.

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As James mentioned, the 100mm is a more 'advanced' lens. It's probably a better lens overall for macro, but it's less versatile. For example, you can take decent fish portraits ( :rolleyes: ) with the 50mm but probably not with the 100mm, which gives you a little more versatility on a single dive while learning to use the dSLR.

 

Like anything else, it's a personal decision. Do you want something flexible and easier to learn with now and plan to move up to the 100mm later? Or do you want to skip the interim step and try to start with the 100mm? Another option is to get the 50mm and the lifesize convertor at the same time, so you effectively have the option to use either. Again, a personal decision.

 

I'm personally picking up the 100mm next month and not using a 50mm. Why? because I've got a 17-40L already and want something with a little more working distance.

 

Just $0.02 from someone who hasn't done enough UW photography this year. :)

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ChrisG has a point.

 

As a "more advanced" photographer than I was last year, I prefer to use the 105mm nikkor macro lens in almost all situations and the 60mm stays in the bag.

 

But when I just started shooting DSLR, I wouldn't have dreamed of using that 105mm lens as a "starter" lens, especially with the crop factor. I always used and recommended the 60mm.

 

So as you climb up the learning curve, and your wants and techniques change, you may change your lens preference. However, if you are a beginner and can only get one macro lens for your Canon, I recommend the more versatile 50mm.

 

My opinion only,

 

James

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For someone new to using a SLR underwater, I recommend the 50 mm (behind a flat port). As stated before a 50 mm (or 60 mm) will allow shooting of a wider range of subjects. I have both the 60 mm and 105 mm. I use the 60 often when I am on a new site and just want to do some "hunting". Also in murky conditions a 50 mm or 60 mm is a better choice since you have to shoot through less water.

 

The 105 is great for gobies and other small and shy critters. It is also much better for use with diopters due to the greater working distance. But shooting paranoid critters and hyper macro ( new word I learned from Robert Delfs ) is more advanced and can be quite frustrating for someone new to a housed SLR!

 

 

I have posted some shots using a 60 mm on DPforum. still waiting for a Wetpixel gallery!

 

http://dpforums.com/dpgallery/showgallery....user=22&cat=500

 

Chris

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FWIW, the other EF lens frequently used for topside shooting is the Tamron 90mm. It's a nice sharp lens, and it's what I own.

 

I haven't used mine underwater yet. The potential problems would be that the lens almost doubles in length when focusing. The focusing motor is non-USM, and not very fast and tends to hunt a lot when trying to focus.

 

Ikelite does list a port for this lens (for nikon use) which presumably would work on 300D.

 

I wouldn't necessarily recoommend this lens given the above, but it is a lot cheaper than the Canon 100mm in most markets. Having said this, if price was the issue I'd probably go with the 50mm +- lifesized converter.

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