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Nick Hope

Dakuwaqa's Dream

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I slowed some of my Fiji clips down to 50% speed, by deinterlacing the original 1080-60i HDV with QTGMC in AviSynth. The result is a 5 minute video that contains just 8 clips, whereas its previous, fast-cut

contained about 100. This slomo approach is new for me. I'd be very interested in feedback. YouTube seems to have mangled the footage a bit and there's little that can be done about that other than avoiding fades and "busy" clips with lots of action (i.e. shoals of fish amongst soft corals).

 

[youtubehd]hdYEF6AhAss[/youtubehd]

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Nice concept and work, Nick. Just a note about the cut from the trevally to the sea snake. I feel it's a little too long a blank space before the next scene, maybe 2 seconds longer than the timing of the rest of the film.

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Hey Nick,

I liked it, the first time I have seen divers in video that really enhanced things due to your slo motion usage. It really provided a certain grace to it. Agree that the break between the trivially and sea snake did seem a touch too long.

Steve

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I slowed some of my Fiji clips down to 50% speed, by deinterlacing the original 1080-60i HDV with QTGMC in AviSynth. The result is a 5 minute video that contains just 8 clips, whereas its previous, fast-cut contained about 100. This slomo approach is new for me. I'd be very interested in feedback. YouTube seems to have mangled the footage a bit and there's little that can be done about that other than avoiding fades and "busy" clips with lots of action (i.e. shoals of fish amongst soft corals).

 

 

As I've said before the advance of video technology is both a blessing and a curse. It's fantastic to see how good the image quality out of the new cameras is (even AVCHD @ 28mbps is more than double the bit-rate of old HDV, not to mention the massive advantage of being Progressive/PsF) ...but I for one find it a struggle to salvage useable material from the old formats like HDV. A couple of things I've found helpful are doing the de-interlacing and other slight adjustments in TMPGenc. Alternatively, the recent versions of Edius do a fantastic job of de-interlacing and provide some powerful tools for grading and YUV adjustment (which HDV seems to always require). The blow-outs in HDV material in particular are a real nightmare to try to correct. Although little can be done to salvage blow-outs I've found that the bland washed-out look of HDV can benefit a lot from some judicious YUV tweaking and/or color grading. Some of it can then even cut reasonably well with new HBR material. :)

 

I believe that Edius also allows good control over clip speed variation (haven't done it myself yet). Perhaps varying the speed of different clips could make such an approach more interesting...say two or three different intensities of slow motion to provide variation for the viewer.

 

I've also recently learned the hard way that submitting to You Tube or Vimeo benefits from as high a bit-rate as they will allow. Usually they re-encode anyway, so giving them a nice high bit-rate to work with shouldn't be a problem and will help with the end result.

 

This short video could be of interest showing what can be done with color grading in Edius for UW material:

 

 

Not sure about the purple cow though...:)

Edited by HDVdiver

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I really liked that, thanks nick.

Cheers Pete.

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Just a note about the cut from the trevally to the sea snake. I feel it's a little too long a blank space before the next scene, maybe 2 seconds longer than the timing of the rest of the film.

Oh dear. For some reason I got the feeling for extending the blue at the end of the trevally clip, sort of to make the viewer wonder what's coming next and exaggerate that contrast with the colorful reef/snake shot. A bit of a case of shot-love probably. I actually slowed the clip down at the end to make it that long because it didn't have enough tail on it. When I watched the finished (still private) video on YouTube I actually thought I should have done a dissolve-transition-through-white there, but was too lazy to do it again. Too bad YT videos can't be replaced like Vimeo ones.

 

...de-interlacing...

If you're up it, QTGMC in AviSynth gives the best software deinterlacing available. I use it on all the clips in my web videos. Smooth 50% slomo is a side-benefit if you don't drop the alternate frames.

 

The blow-outs in HDV material in particular are a real nightmare to try to correct.

Actually I'm finding it pretty straightforward to do this in Vegas Pro with color curves. I typically start with a curve something like this to clip the blacks and rein in the highlights between 235 and 255 (which Sony HDV cams shoot by default). Obviously not much can be done with blown-out highlights >255 though.

roll-off-235-clip-blacks.png

 

Perhaps varying the speed of different clips could make such an approach more interesting...say two or three different intensities of slow motion to provide variation for the viewer.

I agree. But it's pushing it a little to do much slower than 50% with interpolation and not overcranking, depending on the shot of course. I might try some, probably using MVTools or SVPflow in AviSynth. There's going to be A LOT of overcranked slomo around in the future when the FS700 etc. hit the market.

 

I've also recently learned the hard way that submitting to You Tube or Vimeo benefits from as high a bit-rate as they will allow. Usually they re-encode anyway, so giving them a nice high bit-rate to work with shouldn't be a problem and will help with the end result.

I rendered this with x264 at a constant quality value (crf) of 16, which is crazy low. Normally I use 18, but I was getting heavy banding (posterization) during the fade-up from black, so I wanted to give it as much bitrate as possible to try and deal with that. I actually added some noise to that first clip to try to reduce the banding as well.

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