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Any suggestions on how to improve my photography? I'm a relative novice. These were shot with a Canon T1i with 60mm macro lens, Inon 2000 strobe, Watershot housing.

 

Sharpnose puffer, taken off the coast of Cozumel, February 2013.

post-35212-0-64006800-1364145677_thumb.jpg

French grunts, Ft. Lauderdale, FL post-35212-0-13956200-1364145893_thumb.jpg

Sharpnose goby, San Salvador, Bahamas, August 2012 post-35212-0-39886000-1364146008_thumb.jpg

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I like your pictures.

My opinion is that they would benefit from a less crowded background ( negative space).

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You're off to a good start. I think the middle shot is the best one; you did a nice job with the lighting. If you could get a little bit lower in the water so that you are shooting with a slight upward angle as opposed to a downward angle, it would be better. On the first hot, the background distracts from the image and the fish itself is not positioned nicely. You want to engage the viewer of your image by having good eye contact so try to get shots where the fish is facing more towards the camera. You have the right idea with the sharpnose goby picture. The eyes are in focus and you have a nice bokeh. This image would be better if you rotated yourself more to the right so that you were seeing more of the fishes face and the rest of the fishes body was in the frame. Keep it up though, you've off to a great start.

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Thanks, Andy, that is very helpful information.



I like your pictures.

My opinion is that they would benefit from a less crowded background ( negative space).

Thanks, I can see how that would help.

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You're off to a good start. I think the middle shot is the best one; you did a nice job with the lighting. If you could get a little bit lower in the water so that you are shooting with a slight upward angle as opposed to a downward angle, it would be better. On the first hot, the background distracts from the image and the fish itself is not positioned nicely. You want to engage the viewer of your image by having good eye contact so try to get shots where the fish is facing more towards the camera. You have the right idea with the sharpnose goby picture. The eyes are in focus and you have a nice bokeh. This image would be better if you rotated yourself more to the right so that you were seeing more of the fishes face and the rest of the fishes body was in the frame. Keep it up though, you've off to a great start.

Thanks, Andy, this is very helpful information.

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Very nice set! I think you are off to a great start. The grunts are a perfect shot, nothing wrong with that at all.

 

One question I have is: where do you have your strobe positioned on the closer photos, by that I mean the puffer and the goby.

 

Also, could you let us know what your settings are for fstop, shutter speed, and iso?

 

Your colours are great and the exposure is almost there. As the others have mentioned an upward angle would help to isolate the subject more from the background as would strobe positioning. Are you using one strobe or two? A slight change in strobe positioning and fstop/strobe power will make a big difference in the more macro shots to help isolate your subject and make it "pop"

 

I think you are almost there as you have the basics down very well, just a few tweaks here and there

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Very nice set! I think you are off to a great start. The grunts are a perfect shot, nothing wrong with that at all.

 

One question I have is: where do you have your strobe positioned on the closer photos, by that I mean the puffer and the goby.

 

Also, could you let us know what your settings are for fstop, shutter speed, and iso?

 

Your colours are great and the exposure is almost there. As the others have mentioned an upward angle would help to isolate the subject more from the background as would strobe positioning. Are you using one strobe or two? A slight change in strobe positioning and fstop/strobe power will make a big difference in the more macro shots to help isolate your subject and make it "pop"

 

I think you are almost there as you have the basics down very well, just a few tweaks here and there

Thanks, Mike, for your feedback. Strobe positioning is something I have struggled with a lot. For these two closer photos it was at the left of the camera, to the side at about a 45 degree angle, I think. I just have the one strobe, and it was on TTL at the time.

The puffer was shot at f13 at 1/200 sec, ISO 200. The goby was at f6.7 at 1/180 sec. 200 ISO.

If you have any hints about strobe positioning, I would be happy to hear them!

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