Jump to content
stever

Canon 70-200 f4

Recommended Posts

Any experience with this lens, housing? looking for something to get me close enough to shrimp & gobies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any experience with this lens, housing? looking for something to get me close enough to shrimp & gobies.

I have and love the lens. Didn't realize there was a port for it though? I'm interested to see if anybody else has any input.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

 

Big telephoto lenses are of very limited use underwater. The key to getting good images of small subjects is to get physically close to them. the reason many people use high magnification macro lenses is that they allow close focusing, rather than being able to shoot from further away.

 

To light small subjects, you will need to rely on a strobe's output. Depth of field means that you are going to have to shoot pretty wide open.

 

The Canon 70-200mm has a minimum focus distance of 1.2m. Even with big strobes, most of their output will have been absorbed by then!

 

Practically, I'm sure it will be possible to use extensions to put this lens in a housing. You may find zoom rings a challenge however. In reality though I can't actually see what you would achieve in doing so!

 

All the best

 

 

Adam

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Canon 100mm f2.8 IS macro on a 1.6 crop body gets me close enough to shrimpies and gobies unless they are really tiny, and then I add a Subsee +10 diopter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Hi,

 

Big telephoto lenses are of very limited use underwater. The key to getting good images of small subjects is to get physically close to them. the reason many people use high magnification macro lenses is that they allow close focusing, rather than being able to shoot from further away.

 

To light small subjects, you will need to rely on a strobe's output. Depth of field means that you are going to have to shoot pretty wide open.

 

The Canon 70-200mm has a minimum focus distance of 1.2m. Even with big strobes, most of their output will have been absorbed by then!

 

Practically, I'm sure it will be possible to use extensions to put this lens in a housing. You may find zoom rings a challenge however. In reality though I can't actually see what you would achieve in doing so.

 

 

Yes, I totally agree with this. It might be a good lens topside but I, too, am doubtful about its use underwater. My own rule of thumb is a maximum of 3x underwater and that's pushing it. The first dedicated underwater zoom ever made, the 20-35mm Nikonos for the RS AF was "only" 1.75x and I think that the Nikon engineers got that one very right - even though they got many other things on that system very, even seriously, wrong. As ever, getting closer (rather than zooming) is, pretty well always, better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

getting closer is always nice, but closer than 3 ft is very difficult with a goby that's doing it's security job. at 3 ft a goby (not to mention the shrimp) doesn't fill much of the frame with 100mm. I've used the 70-200 on land with the 500d and extensions tubes for close - up of flowers and critters. quality is good and autofocus is faster than macro lenses. with a 12.5mm extension tube the 70-200 focuses from more than 5 ft down to 24 in.

 

With enough extension tube it will work as an autofocus lens at preset focal length - both zoom and MF are serious challenges, but not really necessary for the application (but zoom would make other subjects possible as well). looking at my collection of left-over zoom rings, zoom may be possible (but probably not with extension tube, but +1 diopter may be okay).

 

So I may make this a project. relevant advice welcome.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi partner,

Let me save you some time. Water is roughly 800 times denser than air. We struggle at times to make good clean images with the working distances of the 100mm macro lens underwater (10 -12 inches). Last month in Lembeh I swapped over to the 60mm so I could get the working distance down to less than 6 inches because of the water clarity. Getting close to any creature is a function of your calmness and the lack of threatening behavior. It is relatively easy to get very close to gobys, shrimp and similar critters. Just for fun go to the Wetpixel Flickr group and do a search on Goby. I'd guess there are thousands of good images made with the 60mm and the 100mm (105mm) at very close distances every week.

 

This little guy was happy to pose and while it's not a great image it illustrates the kind of focal length a relaxed diver can expect to have on an average dive. I'd estimate the 60mm I used for this shot was less than 6 inches away. There was nothing special going on here. I just noticed the interesting fin color and made one image as a swam by. If I had spent a little time I could have gotten close.

 

post-4526-0-68663300-1372314727_thumb.jpg

 

I love my 70-200mm f4, it's a wonderful lens to keep on my spare body for capturing good boat pictures. I would counsel to listen to our friend Adam and leave it on the boat.

 

Good Luck,

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sponsors

Advertisements



×
×
  • Create New...