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Sjohnso2

Nauticam vacuum leak detector

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On a DSLR, it takes much more than modest torque to pry off a port. A port with 5" orifice has 99 pounds of pressure pressing it into the housing when at 10 inches Hg of vacuum.

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I think you need to consider that the mating surface is the oring that is only 1-2mm so the force on those is considerably small. Otherwise there wouldn't be any explanation other than user error to the port falling off

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Another vote for the Leak Sentinel by Vivid Housings. Much less expensive, easy to install, and has worked great for me. I've never had a false positive, even when diving a bit colder water in the Galapagos.

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Some thing is missing here?

Did the dome seperate fron the port adapter?

If so, how is the dome normally attached to the port adapter?

At what depth did this happen?

What was the approximate air temp when the housing was closed?

What was the approximate water temp when the seperation occured?

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Sorry for thread drift...

 

Maybe a stupid question but has anyone noticed any difference in the buoyancy of their housing when using a vacuum?

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Sorry for thread drift...

 

Maybe a stupid question but has anyone noticed any difference in the buoyancy of their housing when using a vacuum?

 

A couple of litres of air don't amount to a hill of beans in a world of troubles...

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I think that at the depth where the dome fell off of Tim's housing, the pressure on the dome was considerably greater than 200 g.

Bill

 

More like 2-300 kg!

 

The glass parted from the plate, so the dome fell apart: the dome didn't fall off, nor the o-ring on the mounting leak. My guess is that the o-ring above the glass moved, letting the glass shift in turn. The plate has a very thin rim and the glass had a slight chip on the ground surface that may have made a leak more likely. Having said that, the dome had been to 40m and had been on hundreds of dives after failing in a swimming pool and being repaired.

 

The design of the current dome is different.

Edited by tdpriest
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Turbohampster asked "Maybe a stupid question but has anyone noticed any difference in the buoyancy of their housing when using a vacuum?"

 

The density of air at sea level at 15°C is 1.225 grams per liter. Pumping the housing down to negative 10" Hg at the surface will decrease this by roughly 33%, resulting in about 0.408 grams per liter change in weight by applying the vacuum. Most DSLR housings have an internal volume of less than 2 liters, so the change in buoyancy will be less than 1 gram.

Edited by diverdoug1
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Love doug answer! On a practical note the valves are around 60-80 grams negative so once you install it the rig gets heavier both in and out of water

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Thanks everyone for all the positive feedback. I also could not find the parts from Nauticam to install myself so I just sent the housing in for an upgrade and service. I cannot wait to get it back and take it for a test dive. I will post an update as soon as baby returns.

 

Steve

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I have on my GX7 housing. I think it is great. Cheap for the peace of mind it gives.

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I think the Nauticam Vacuum Leak Detector is effected by temperature variations... Its been perfect since I've had it but over the past couple of weekends I've pumped it up at home (steady green), taken to the dive shop (steady green) and then out on the boat - only to discover its gone to flashing yellow for when I'm about to hit the water. We are talking about 2-3hrs between pumping it and then it going yellow - so I think the housing is sealed correctly... as you would think (and according to the instructions) it would fail after 20mins or so..

 

This afternoon, I took it apart and relubed the main oring in the housing and also the port and re-pumped it, as it was still damp, I moved it outside (still in the shade) and let it dry - I came back and again noticed it had gone to flashing yellow.

 

Its now in the 30+'c here where as a few weeks ago it was low 20's so I am wondering if it can be effected by temp....

Edited by thetrickster

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The nauticam system is declared to be temperature compensated so what Richard describes should not happen

 

It does happen with my Leak Sentinel so I need to make sure I take precautions

 

I would do a few tests and then call Nauticam to discuss if I was Richard

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The manual states:

Attention: Although the vacuum indicator is designed to compensate for a certain amount of temperature variation, it is recommended to conduct the vacuum test in an environment where the temperature is stable.

 

So I think I must of found the limit of the temperature circuity! :)

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The manual states:

 

 

So I think I must of found the limit of the temperature circuity! :)

Uhm not really I read you need to conduct the initial test that is watertight at constant temperature then it should store the value and start the compensation algorythm

 

Need more information on the specs as it is not unusual to get 10C delta T for video

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Richard,

You would get the same indication if you had a very small leak. I had mine go yellow after 4 hrs when I forgot to install the plug on the strobe connection and the connector was open to ambient. Took me a while to figure out what I had done. Not sure something like that is your issue but I wouldn't automatically assume it's the temperature compensation issue.

 

Good luck,

Steve

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@Klik

Remove the O-ring that keep the original "plastic LED holder/lense" (whatever it should be called).

You do not need to remove more than that. You have a new one in your package.

Use the new one it is easier.

 

I believe that they have used a small drop of glue originally to hold the LED in place. I think that I was cutting the old wires , due to that.

 

/Erik

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@Klik

Remove the O-ring that keep the original "plastic LED holder/lense" (whatever it should be called).

You do not need to remove more than that. You have a new one in your package.

Use the new one it is easier.

 

I believe that they have used a small drop of glue originally to hold the LED in place. I think that I was cutting the old wires , due to that.

 

/Erik

 

Thank you.

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Well...I finally got my house retrofitted and took the whole rig to Bonaire for a week long test. What a sweet system! I was impressed with the job Reef photo did and it works so well. I don't know how i managed without a vacuum system before. The peace of mind is worth every penny i spent. Just to look at the light after changing the system from wide to macro before a dive and not to worry about the possibility of leaks was awesome. I spent a total of 29 hours under water without a thought about the housing. The led is easy to see in day light as well as under the water. I left the system powered on the whole week and the battery is still fine.

Thanks for all the feed back. If there are any questions I can answer feel free to ask.

 

Regards,

Steve

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