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magicfx

How to shoot like Japanese UW photographer?

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Shallow depth of field, maybe 4.0 or less. Two strobes at 60* or more, even lighting.....

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Don’t forget shooting wide angle with nothing in the frame!

 

(I am only joking!)

 

Alex

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Is there a defined Japanese style? Who are the great/well known Japanese Uw photographers? I follow one on Instagram, and yeah, his photos do look like the one in the link...

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I think Bokeh is not the appropriate idea here. Bokeh is a characteristic of a lens (not a style). You can shoot shallow depth of field with any lens/camera that will allow it, but as far as I understand it Bokeh means the "pleasingness" of the out of focus areas and has a lot to do with lens design and some magic thrown into it. For a look at how to measure bokeh, take a look at

http://photo.net/nikon-camera-forum/00aDI7

:clapping:

Bill

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Jun Fukui is one of the famous underwater artists:

http://jun291blog.com/blog-entry-723.html

 

As we know, classic marco photo is with black background,

But this style is not popular in Japan.

Probably because they don't have volcanic soil habitat like Anilao or Lembeh,

So they must shoot subject with complex reef background, but try to separate subject from reef background.

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As we know, classic macro photo is with black background,

But this style is not popular in Japan.

Probably because they don't have volcanic soil habitat like Anilao or Lembeh,

 

 

 

The "classic" black background is created by a high shutter speed and a high f-stop, the image relies on strobe lighting. It hasn't got anything to do with the colour of the background, because it's best shot against the water rather than the reef.

 

post-4522-0-22312700-1409095200_thumb.jpg

 

 

The light, unfocussed background relies on ambient light, slower shutter speeds, wider apertures and balanced strobe lighting. It's harder to do. I often find that my backgrounds are too dark.

 

post-4522-0-56690000-1409095412_thumb.jpg

 

 

Please accept my apologies for the (glitch-squared) below...

Edited by tdpriest
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As we know, classic macro photo is with black background,

But this style is not popular in Japan.

Probably because they don't have volcanic soil habitat like Anilao or Lembeh,

 

 

 

The "classic" black background is created by a high shutter speed and a high f-stop, the image relies on strobe lighting. It hasn't got anything to do with the colour of the background, because it's best shot against the water rather than the reef.

 

post-4522-0-22312700-1409095200_thumb.jpg

 

 

The light, unfocussed background relies on ambient light, slower shutter speeds, wider apertures and balanced strobe lighting. It's harder to do. I often find that my backgrounds are too dark.

 

post-4522-0-56690000-1409095412_thumb.jpg

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As we know, classic macro photo is with black background,

But this style is not popular in Japan.

Probably because they don't have volcanic soil habitat like Anilao or Lembeh,

 

 

 

The "classic" black background is created by a high shutter speed and a high f-stop, the image relies on strobe lighting. It hasn't got anything to do with the colour of the background, because it's best shot against the water rather than the reef.

 

post-4522-0-22312700-1409095200_thumb.jpg

 

 

The light, unfocussed background relies on ambient light, slower shutter speeds, wider apertures and balanced strobe lighting. It's harder to do. I often find that my backgrounds are too dark.

 

post-4522-0-56690000-1409095412_thumb.jpg

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Japanese style? :o

Shallow depth of field is just a technique used to highlight a certain part of an image (and sometimes an unavoidable result of great magnification in macro images...). Black or blurred backgrounds have nothing to do with where you take the pictures... just open your lenses, get close (powerful close up lenses will help getting SDF) and enjoy.

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I shot this with a D7000 & 105mm micro @ 1/200 F22 ISO400 with the strobes behind the port and slightly turned in.

 

12530780855_c6c724338c_c.jpg

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