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JBG

I need advice about wet lenses for my NA-RX100IV housing. (please advise)

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Hi Guys:

I'm a newbie to underwater photography and I'm trying to make the best choice possible with limited knowledge. I have a question about wet lenses for my Nauticam NA-RX100IV housing. Here is my new rig set up....

 

1PmaqQ7U.jpg

I will be wanting to shoot both macro and wide angle photos as well as video. My first thought is making it as easy as possible to mount and unmount lenses when switching from one to the other. There will be moments where I wont be using any wet lenses, so I will need INON M67 lens holders for my INON float arms (seen in photo). There is also a carrier bar above the housing that can be used to mount accessories if need be.

I've looked into the INON UCL-165M67 Close-up Lens (+6). Since they are stackable I could switch from macro to super macro easily. It was recommended I go with the SubSee +10. I read somewhere I would likely be shooting mostly +5-6 and +10 would be occasional use. Is this correct? If so, wouldn't it it better to go the 2x +6 approach?

For wide angle, I have been looking at the INON UFL-165AD Fisheye Lens.

I've also heard of bayonet mounts that make it quick and easy to transition over form one lens to the other. Can both the close up lens and the fisheye lens be used with the bayonet?

Would these be good choices? If so, what would be the best way to mount them on the rig? For example, the close-up lens to one of the arm floats and the fisheye to the carrier bar since its too big for the other float? What about lens holders that are bayonet style, can this be done?

I hope this is clear enough to help you understand what I'm attempting to accomplish. What do you think about the products I'm considering? Do you have any suggestions?

I would appreciate your help.

Thanks

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i guess you may want to post this in the consumer / compact session as the RX100 is not mirrorless

 

Either way the RX100 Mark IV has a relatively short zoom so to achieve macro you need fairly strong diopters such as the Nauticam CMC or a Subsee 10 or Inon UCL100

For wide angle the Inon lens you mention is not compatible you can go the Nauticam route I guess with the WWL-1

 

For video however the RX100 fails to white balance so you will need a further lens you can use with a push on filter or a filter inside the housing for the WWL-1

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i guess you may want to post this in the consumer / compact session as the RX100 is not mirrorless

 

Either way the RX100 Mark IV has a relatively short zoom so to achieve macro you need fairly strong diopters such as the Nauticam CMC or a Subsee 10 or Inon UCL100

For wide angle the Inon lens you mention is not compatible you can go the Nauticam route I guess with the WWL-1

 

For video however the RX100 fails to white balance so you will need a further lens you can use with a push on filter or a filter inside the housing for the WWL-1

Thanks for the suggestions and insight. I accidentally posted this in the wrong forum. I wonder if a moderator would be kind enough to move it. I wouldn't want to double post.

 

I like the Nauticam CMC lens. It has some cool features and accessories.

 

I'll check into the white balancing concern. What filter would you recommend?

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Most direct advice I can offer: the sooner you move past wanting to shoot macro + wide angle + video on the same dive with the same rig, the better.

 

Yes it is technically possible. No it will not lead to optimal results. Why? IMO it is more about mindset and technique than equipment. if you go down wanting to capture everything you come across, your images may be rushed and mediocre. If you go down configured for a particular scenario, you can make the most of it when you find it and although you will miss some shots you will maximize others.

 

I tried it for a long time. When I finally accepted this advise and concentrated on one thing per dive, my satisfaction with the results went up a lot.

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Most direct advice I can offer: the sooner you move past wanting to shoot macro + wide angle + video on the same dive with the same rig, the better.

 

Yes it is technically possible. No it will not lead to optimal results. Why? IMO it is more about mindset and technique than equipment. if you go down wanting to capture everything you come across, your images may be rushed and mediocre. If you go down configured for a particular scenario, you can make the most of it when you find it and although you will miss some shots you will maximize others.

 

I tried it for a long time. When I finally accepted this advise and concentrated on one thing per dive, my satisfaction with the results went up a lot.

Yeah, I'd agree with troporbo. Tempting though it is to set up to be able to cover everything and every eventuality, I found when I moved from P/S to SLR, and the limits the later imposes in-water, that my images definitely improved and not just because of the camera upgrade. You have to concentrate your thinking and how you see things on the reef. I found that this made me compose things better as I was only looking at possible images in one format, be it macro or wide-angle.

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Most direct advice I can offer: the sooner you move past wanting to shoot macro + wide angle + video on the same dive with the same rig, the better.

 

That has been my experience as well. If you go down with specific subject(s) in mind you are even more likely to find them because you won't be distracted as much by the sensory overload of all other visual impressions.

 

Bart

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There are few places where you can actually find good subject for both. For video is much easier than for still images to change wide to macro

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Looking at your rig you need another strobe and should put the light on top of the camera for macro. If you want to use strobes and lights on the arm you need a triple clamp

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Looking at your rig you need another strobe and should put the light on top of the camera for macro. If you want to use strobes and lights on the arm you need a triple clamp

Thanks man. You're right. I never really clarified my full intentions. I plan to go macro as a stepping stone. Then when I go wide angle I will add another strobe plus video light and I'll extend the arms with more floats. Instead of triple clamps I will use these.....

 

nau.72512_1.jpg

Edited by JBG

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BTW Interceptor. I took your advise and went with the Nauticam products. The CMC-1 macro wet lens. I will get the WWL-1 wide angle later. For now I will use the flip mount instead of the bayonet mount. I am considering what others have said and may choose to dive with one goal in mind from dive to dive.

Edited by JBG

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BTW Interceptor. I took your advise and went with the Nauticam products. The CMC-1 macro wet lens. I will get the WWL-1 wide angle later. For now I will use the flip mount instead of the bayonet mount. I am considering what others have said and may choose to dive with one goal in mind from dive to dive.

 

Good man! I find it works really well if you can do a bit of research for what's good in the area you're diving (if you don't know it already) then you can start visualising what images might crop up and have your camera set up for that.

 

I then try to look for good backgrounds to take the shots; and hope some helpful critter is either on it or going to coming along and cooperate.

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I will try to offer a slightly different perspective since most people are advocating you drop the idea of wanting to do both wide and macro.

 

Being also an avid topside photographer, i believe it really depends on your proficiency and shooting style. There will always be people who prefer to walk around with a 28-300mm lens while others are happy enough with a 35mm. There are also those who enjoy lugging around a bag full of lenses.

 

I started underwater photography several years back with an s90 with a subsee +10, an ufl165, a small focus light, and a single strobe. While it was not the dream full blown setup, it was really compact, and enabled me to shoot very decent wide and macro subjects which gave results I was pretty satisfied with. This is more so especially when I do not have the luxury to go on dive trips more than once or twice a year, so limiting my dives to wither WA or macro only per dive does not achieve what I personally want to do with the rig, and that's enjoying and capturing the beautiful underwater scenery(do note I'm more of a landscape photographer).

 

Having said all that, I just returned from a trip to the Maldives with an upgraded rig( rx100m3 in a cheap plastic housing, uwl-h100+dome, LD adapters/lens holders, same arms, same strobe, same subsee). I must admit that due to the nature/dynamics of the dive group, I rarely had the chance/opportunity to spend time on macros(adjusting lighting, manual focus, etc). I had the WA on for 75% of the time, with the remaining 25% with the naked camera port so I can zoom in on subjects that stayed far away(hunting sharks/barracudas, at cleaning stations, etc). Still, I was really glad to be able to bayonet the WA on/off, or half the photos would have really small subjects within the frame(being able to crop a 20mp raw also helps!)

Edited by fongalv
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I've also come to the conclusion that shooting one thing at a time is a preferable approach. And i upgraded from the Sony RX 11 to the Nikon D500 . Can't seem to find a buyer for my one year old compact system .

 

What I would like to know is if I can expect the Nauticam CMC-1 to work on the D500 with a 105mm lens . It fits just fine :)

but is designed for compact / mirrorless as opposed to the Nauticam Super Macro Lens which is described as a wet macro lens

for full framed cameras.

 

I know that i can try and see what happens but I'm also curious as to what to expect and wanting to hear that the results will be

negligible , in any case learning to capture focus on this lens is a challenge and keeps it all fun , I like it , around Cebu is where i'm

located

 

thanks for any feed back

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feed back from a guy

 

Hi John,

Both the CMC-1 and SMC are diopters, so in general, they would both work with compacts and DSLR's alike.
However, the CMC-1 was specifically optimized and tested with compact and MIL cameras, whereas the SMC was specifically designed for the 105mm and 100mm lenses (Nikon and Canon respectively), on both cropped and FF sensors.
I recommend trying out your D500 with 105mm + CMC-1 and see if you're happy with the results.
If you are, no need to upgrade.
I will actually be testing the same combination myself in a couple of weeks in Cozumel - D500 + 105mm + CMC-1. I'll let you know how it goes!

Best Regards,

Ran Mor

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I'm confused. Given your explanation, why would you recommend the CMC, designed for a MIL, for a DX camera for which the SMC was designed?

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