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I have a Sony AX100 with a gates housing and want to get in to manual white balance. Sony has one push options, my question, should I white balance with the red filter on or off? And...at what depth intervals should I re white balance?

Thanks.

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Hi,

 

It is depth and water condition/color dependent. In general, in shallow (less than 18m) blue water, white balance with the red filter in place. For deeper dives, or in green water, no red filter.

 

I tend to white balance every 2 meters or so.

 

I assume you are not using lights...

 

Adam

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Adam,

 

I have lights, dual 3200 lm. What is your suggestion for that?

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Hi,

 

Until now, I have always used auto wb on my still cameras, but now I am planning to do some ambient light u/w photography with a red filter. Can someone please tell me exactly how to "white balance?" I'm not sure what to do to accomplish it.

Thanks!

Tom

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The how part is relatively simple. I do videography but I'm sure stills are the same. You change the setting on your camera to WB manual. You hold a slate or white fins or something white in front of your camera and push the button. You'll be amazed how the picture changes. I have a manual point and shoot I use on the surface and I only WB manual. I find the auto WB is normally wrong. Now the when to apply part...that's confusing. Depth strobes video lights filters that all comes in to play when and how to WB. That part im just now learning. The beauty of video is that I can see the changes as they progress. Stills and strobes confuse me. Hope that helps.

 

 

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Just to add to Dbuky's point, as Adam explains, if you are going to manual WB you need to do it often as the temperature/colour of the light can change as you go deeper/shallower, as the sun moves/drops/goes off.

 

Frankly, I've always found it a pain (for stills). Shoot Auto and then if necessary, which I find isn't often, adjust with Lightroom or some such.

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Adding lights complicates the issue!

 

It is crucial to balance the color temperature between the lights and the ambient. Typically, this is best achieved by simply setting the camera's WB to whatever the light's color temp is.

 

Changing WB with depth will not really work. The light from your lights will look weird.

 

There are filters available for the lights that adjust the light's output to simulate the actual spectrum that is available at depth.

 

You can also use a WB target set up so that it is lit by your lights and ambient at depth. You can then adjust the colors in post.

 

Adam

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I zip-tied little white wiffle balls to my wife's (and usual dive model) dry suit pockets. This serves the dual purpose of being a nice handle for the zipper pocket and a great White Balance target I can usually count on in Lightroom post processing.

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Adam,

 

So in other words, illuminate the subject first then WB? Or run an auto WB and correct white in studio?

 

These are all issues of their own. I find it easier to correct white later then to make colors pop in studio. I know there's no one all solution, then there's practicality, your balanced on a subject and a manta ray shows up 15 feet shallower and there's no time to adjust. I guess I'm looking for a one all fits most and fine tune in specific situations vs. the other way around. This topic specific to my Phillipines trip for macro. I'm used to shooting wrecks and large animals that move a lot.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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I've done some post WB setting in LR but the issue is where the white sample is in relation to your main subject. Colour is lost not only in depth but in distance that the light travels. If you are at 30 feet and the bottom is 10 feet below you then the distance the reflect light off the bottom travels is 50 feet (40 feet bottom + 10 feet relection) or that is what I understand.

 

From my readings, its why they say get in close for pictures with strobes. Same thing applies to the overall distance the light needs to travel.

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There really is no need to white balance if you are shooting macro. You should be getting enough light on your subject in most cases and auto white balance will give you 99% of what you need. The exception is the shark that swims up when you are sporting your 100mm macro lens. You might need to do a bit more of a WB adjustment at that point.

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There really is no need to white balance if you are shooting macro. You should be getting enough light on your subject in most cases and auto white balance will give you 99% of what you need. The exception is the shark that swims up when you are sporting your 100mm macro lens. You might need to do a bit more of a WB adjustment at that point.

 

Not just WB adjustment, eh? :lol2:

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Eagle Ray,

 

I am shooting video and have to zoom so I'm not switching lenses. However, thanks for the advice for WB on macro, my only concern is if I can switch between auto and manual WB while in the housing, that I will have to see.

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Apparently it's hard to get a proper padi wb slate in Sweden, and very overpriced to order one online (shipping 3x the price of the slate) so I was wondering if I could use a regular slate (https://www.watersportswarehouse.co.uk/shop/scuba-diving-equipment/accessories/slates/beaver-underwater-slate-with-1031677.html) something like that, and just ditch the pen. Are these slates usually matt enough to serve as a wb slate?

Cheers

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yep, they should do.

Edited by bubffm
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Apparently it's hard to get a proper padi wb slate in Sweden, and very overpriced to order one online (shipping 3x the price of the slate) so I was wondering if I could use a regular slate (https://www.watersportswarehouse.co.uk/shop/scuba-diving-equipment/accessories/slates/beaver-underwater-slate-with-1031677.html) something like that, and just ditch the pen. Are these slates usually matt enough to serve as a wb slate?

Cheers

 

What about this one? You could aditionally learn some german with the "Digital Underwater Photographer"-Manual... :D

 

http://www.ebay.de/itm/PADI-Specialty-Manual-Digital-U-W-Photography-WB-Slate-Deutsch-/171862578642

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Lots of good comments here on colour differences at depth but also distance. I use 2 strobes but when I'm taking a wide angle, turn off the strobes. Back in LR, I try to find a white/grey piece of sand or something, at the distance I was from the subject, to set the white balance. This is important because a white glove on your hand will not record the proper WB. Sometimes on a wreck, I'll decide on a distance then put down my white slate and take a picture just as a reference for WB. I still have to sometimes mess with the temp/tint manually. When I'm using my strobes, I stay with auto WB.

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I have been shooting with Auto White Balance with my setup. I recently took a photo class with John at Buddy Dive Resort in Bonaire. He is quite a character by the way. He recommended Cloudy white balance setting on my D810. I have compared the images and experimented on Nikon NX-D (Nikon image editing/converter program). The advantage of NX-D that it does to RAW image exactly what the camera would do in my understanding. Anyway, it seems to me that the images in Cloudy settings are better right out of the camera, compared to Auto WB setting. They seem to require less adjustments.

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