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I am a bit puzzled about magic filters. I must say I have not used any so far, but I do not understand the point. I mean, which is the advantage of applying a filter to block/attenuate some of the incoming light frequencies? Would not it be easier and more accurate to act in post process on the raw file by balancing the color channels (or doing white balance)? Furthermore each magic filter is designed to work well only at certain water depth/light intensity/water colour... Or did I miss the whole point?

Anybody could explain?

ciao, F.

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Magic Filters / URPro and the like - definitely serve a purpose for cameras where manual white balancing is not available (or rubbish), or if there is no possibility of shooting RAW - They do work wonders.

 

I wouldn't dwell on the 'certain depth/light' aspect - they work pretty well at all depths within 5-20m.

 

They are really useful for video shooters too, who are not able to shoot raw - but my issue is that you are stuck with ambient lighting with filters, if they are internally mounted.

 

You are however right, that shooting RAW does negate the usefulness of the filters, I think even Alex and Peter have agreed with this.

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You are however right, that shooting RAW does negate the usefulness of the filters, I think even Alex and Peter have agreed with this.

 

probably not. see the link http://www.magic-filters.com/need.htmland the 3 wreck photos.

 

the idea is that the filters helps to give a more natural distribution over the RGB channels. It removes the (excess of) blue, so the camera will record more equal levels of the colours (closer to the natural white balance).

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Richard, Gerard, thanks for your answers.

No doubt that filters would be very useful if no WB / raw info is available for the images and to speed up video processing... I've seen the 3 wreck photos, Alex explains them very well in his latest book (what a greeeeeat book)... even so I am not fully convinced that you could not get the same results applying software filters in post processing, I guess I should just try one of those magic filters and shut up. ;-)

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what lens are you using ? I still have sets of green and blue water magic filters for sigma 15mm (i changed to tokina 10-17mm).

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Well, you could always push your WB towards more red in post BUT that would affect your blue too, making it more muddled as you move the entire image towards red. Remember, moving your WB in post will affect ALL the colors. The magic filter gives you the ability to achieve the red without the need to muddle the blue. Yes, you can work on individual color channels with more or less pleasing results, but the filter will easily get you the right, pleasing balance and color deep into the field.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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Hi,

 

When you do a global what balance correction in post, you create a (global) color shift. This typically means that you end up with very washed out/grey looking blues in wide angle scenes when underwater as the white balance target (sand/aluminum tank etc.) is actually quite blue due to the lack of red light.

 

What the filter does is to remove some of the blue light from the capture, which means that you can effect global correction (either underwater or in post) and retain the deep rich natural blues that actually occur.

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I agree that the instant fix 'wow' of filters is really useful and a great way for beginners to get great results instantly, but depending on the quality of the footage and the recording format. You can use many color correcting tools to bring the blue channel down and then do any additional global corrections and you'll end up in the same place - without the loss of 1 stop of light and if videoing an important one for me, no red/pink cast if you accidentally film in the direction of the sun.

 

Personally I would love to keep using filters, saves lots of time, but at this time there isn't any flippable internal filter holders for DSLR/Mirrorless ports like you get on Gates etc. so constraining myself to ambient lighting isn't desirable - as I'm using domes / wet lenses.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Even with RAW you won't have a red channel below 20' unless you use a filter or artificial light. Make the choice before the dive because a common mistake I see are shooters using a filter with lights and wondering why everything is pink or orange. External light, OR filter, but seldom both. Happy shooting! :)

Edited by Cwee

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