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Dbuky

White Balance

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Hey all, I shoot a Sony AX 100 and white balance w a slate. I find that if I add light it turns red. I started putting light on the slate and then WB off the slate. I cant find a good balance. Should I be WB auto when using light? Also when should I add red filter with WB and lights?

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Very good article, I have read this before. If I plan to use lights, I would assume Auto is the way to go, with a magenta filter? I too have the gates slate and do the WB one push very often but the lights mess me up. Also I WB without red filter, that was not looking right. I was shooting macro and was leased, but I couldn't light it up as I was in manual. Will the camera allow for adjustment between auto and manual in the housing? I can not find an answer on this.

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I don't have an AX100 and haven't read that article in full but with my old Sony cameras, if I was using lights, I would generally use auto white balance and no filter. Not sure why you'd want to use a magenta filter. For available sunlight I usually a blue-water filter (pinkish orange) and manual white balance, usually on the palm of my hand.

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Very good article, I have read this before. If I plan to use lights, I would assume Auto is the way to go, with a magenta filter? I too have the gates slate and do the WB one push very often but the lights mess me up. Also I WB without red filter, that was not looking right. I was shooting macro and was leased, but I couldn't light it up as I was in manual. Will the camera allow for adjustment between auto and manual in the housing? I can not find an answer on this.

 

I have changed from a red to a magenta filter on my AX100 and I use auto WB most of the time. This gets me a pretty good WB for final correction in post. You can also play with adding magenta-tint in the camera WB settings instead of a filter. You could then swivel the filter out in shallow water and add swivel-in once you go deeper if your housing allows (the Gates I own does). I have also tried auto WB without filter - which might work well on other cameras but I find does not give satisfactory results with the AX100.

 

I just found that I am not getting much better results by using manual WB - and it saves all that addl. hassle of carrying plates and balancing every couple minutes. But every user has to find its own way. Pete's guidelines linked by Nick give some pretty good guidance for the AX100 and helped me quite a bit.

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Thank you, I will try AWB as it is a pain in the ass

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Hi Dbuky,

 

The AX100 is a great camera, one I was seriously looking at myself. However as you can see it doesn't have the best White Balance underwater, which is a shame.

 

Simply..

Using any lights underwater? = NO Filter and set the WB to the Kelvin of the lights (if you can, otherwise use 'shade' is my preference)

Using only the ambient light? = Use Filters and CWB/MWB or just MWB on its own, if camera is good (which the AX100 isn't)

 

I wouldn't use AWB, incase the ambient light interferes and causes a WB shift, I would lock it to one of the presents (Custom like shade, indoors etc) which is the most pleasing to the eye.

 

You can get very technical, by using lights with a filter on the camera, but they you need the reserve filter on the lights ('Cyan Filters').

 

Pete's guide is excellent, with a lot of work gone into it, to get pleasing colours from the AX100, but is aimed at only ambient lit shots.

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(...)

 

You can get very technical, by using lights with a filter on the camera, but they you need the reserve filter on the lights ('Cyan Filters').

(...)

 

According to my experience with my old Sony, cyan filters can help you to equate a little the color temperature of ambient and artificial lights, but you won't be able to match them at all. (so if you MWB on natural light, when you turn your lights on you will still get redish in your closer subjects)

I guess the best results should be achieved by white balancing on a white or grey subject (1 meter away from the camera) lighted by ambient light and your own lights filtered with cyan filters.

I would have loved to do this test with my new gear, but unfortunately my Solas 2000 don't have thread to use filters.

Edited by Etc

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