Jump to content

Recommended Posts

All, I shoot w Sony AX-100 when, how or why would I use or apply the ND Filter?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Dbuky,

 

the ND Filter acts like "sunglasses" to the camera, so they are not that relevant for shooting underwater, where you are more likely to be short of light rather than the other way round..

 

However, in certain situaitons where you are shooting in shallow water on a sunny day it might help to switch on the ND Filter in its first position to avoid that your shutter-speed goes up to 300 or 400, which would result in a not so nice picture quality. With ND1 on, you would keep the shutter down to 100 (for Europe) or 120 (for US) - which looks much nicer.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I miss it in my camera when pointing to the sun, specially in shalow waters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I miss it in my camera when pointing to the sun, specially in shalow waters.

 

Yes, its definitely useful for those kind of situations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One not so often mentioned use of the ND filter is to reduce softness caused by diffraction. The AX100 has a 1” sensor, so diffraction will cause a softer pic by around f5.6, if not before. So when you want to maximize resolution, shoot about 1 or 2 stops down aperturewise, around f4-5 wide open. That and using the correct shutter speed means using the ND filter to control light.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Dbuky,

 

the ND Filter acts like "sunglasses" to the camera, so they are not that relevant for shooting underwater, where you are more likely to be short of light rather than the other way round..

 

However, in certain situaitons where you are shooting in shallow water on a sunny day it might help to switch on the ND Filter in its first position to avoid that your shutter-speed goes up to 300 or 400, which would result in a not so nice picture quality. With ND1 on, you would keep the shutter down to 100 (for Europe) or 120 (for US) - which looks much nicer.

Do you mean shutter speed or ISO?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you mean shutter speed or ISO?

I guess he did meant shutter speed.

We are assuming here ISO is at minimun level here

Edited by Etc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess he did meant shutter speed.

We are assuming here ISO is at minimun level here

 

Absolutely correct. In those lighting situations the camera will operate at native ISO (resp. 0 DB GAIN) and you use the ND filter to keep the Shutter speed in check resp. operate at the aperture you desire.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I understand the problem of too high an ISO. What is the problem of a fast shutter speed, so long as the strobe syncs if you are using one?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The "norm" for video is to shoot with the shutter open for half the duration of each frame. That means 1/120 if you're shooting 60 fps. 1/100 if you're shooting 50 fps. 1/60 if you're shooting 30 fps. 1/48 (or 1/50 if that's all that's available) if you're shooting 24 fps etc.. This is alternatively known as 180 degrees, as it dates back to rotary shutters on film cameras and projectors. A faster shutter speed is possible but with movement you will get a stuttery effect, a bit like a cartoon flipbook, because less motion-blur is captured. Having said that I've published loads of video with a faster shutter than 180 degrees. With a static shot it doesn't matter. I've even used 360 degrees (1/30 at 30p) in dark situations, rather than increase the ISO. Fast shutter speeds can be good for doing slow motion in post-production, where the motion interpolators like sharp frames to work with.

 

Not sure how strobe sync is relevant to video.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sponsors

Advertisements



×
×
  • Create New...