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Nicool

avoiding red eyes in close-up fish portraits?

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hi guys,

Many of my fish portraits don't look so good because of the "red eye" effect which also affects fishes.

I am talking about relatively close-up shots, typically shot with a 60mm macro lens (APS-C DSLR), 2 strobes in manual mode, shooting scorpionfishes, pipe fishes, etc.

 

Here's an example i have handy, although on this particular shot it's not too bad (i wouldn't have published it otherwise ;)), it can get much worse:

https://flic.kr/p/YNpWa3

 

When i started underwater photography, i was shooting with a 105mm macro in TTL, got some red eyes, but the Lightroom version i used at that time (v3?) was capable to remove the red eyes the same feature as for humans did work brilliantly.

Now on Lightroom 6 it doesn't work.

 

I thought about using the camera's onboard red eye reduction mode, but it actually relies on the AF assistance light, which is of no use in an undrwater housing.

So question to the crowd: how are you preventing red eyes from ruining your fish portraits?

 

cheers

Nicolas

 

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But lightroom used to work so well! I’ll get you some more stringent examples

 

 

Envoyé de mon iPhone en utilisant Tapatalk

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https://www.thesprucecrafts.com/what-causes-green-eye-in-photographs-2688812

Human eyes reflect red because the light is hitting the retina's blood vessels.

The eyes of animals, on the other hand, reflect green, blue, white, or yellow light because of their night vision.

Many animals have a membrane called the tapetum lucidum in their eyes. In animals that have this membrane, the light is blocked from striking the blood-rich retina that would show up as red eye.

Different light spectrums are reflected from this membrane based on its chemical makeup and it can vary from one animal to the next.

Blue-eyed cats do not have the same membrane in their eyes so they actually show red eye instead."

https://allyouneedisbiology.wordpress.com/2017/03/05/vision-fish/

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The standard way to avoid for terrestrial animals is get the flash further off camera, Otherwise just select the eye and darken it, there are subtle ways of doing this, I don't use lightroom, only photoshop so can't give an exact recipe.

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Doesn't actually look like redeye in that seahorse photo?? But if you want to adjust, either PS masking or radial filter in LR. Avoiding it means moving strobes further from the lens.

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I see nothing “wrong” with the example that you posted Nicolas. If I may offer a suggestion: experiment with altering the angles that your strobes are oriented in relation to your subject. The more oblique that angle is, the less likely that you’ll be prone to the red eye effect.

 

This will get you on your way to experimenting with side lighting, (sorry, this is another can of worms, but a logical progression), and then you can try using different power settings from each side, (lighting ratios), with which you’ll be able to create shadows as you so choose.

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