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Bdfleischer

Canon 100 mm macro

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Hi, Just upgraded from a comfortable 60 mm macro lens that I used on a Canon 7d/Ikelite housing and DS161 strobes. I had great success in capturing macro shots- but on my first outing with a new Canon 5d Mk IV, 100mm macro lens, and new Nauticam housing I found focusing and even finding the subject (I also upgraded to a 45 deg viewfinder) incredibly difficult to do!

 

Any pro tips on managing the change from the 60 to 100mm lens?

 

Much appreciate it!

Edited by Bdfleischer

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I suspect much of it has to do with the 45°finder, I've seen posts saying it takes quite a few dives to get used to. I'd say swap back to the 60mm for a while but that's an EF-S lens not a full frame.lens. Can you swap back to the standard viewfinder for a while to see if the lens is behaving as expected? Maybe start with bigger subjects for a while and work smaller as you get used to it.

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Well i could never adjust to a 45 degree viewfinder preferring the straight. But i think the bigger issue could be not using a focus light. Get a good powerful focus light of at least 500 lumen or more and where power can be manually adjusted. This will really help i think.

 

Cheers,

 

Diggy

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I agree with the guys that a 45 degree finder does take a little getting used to. But once you have cracked it, I'm sure you'll love it - especially for macro. They are just great for being able to get into slightly trickier low-level angles that macro often demands.

 

I do think, too, that longer length macros do present a bit off a learning curve over the 60mm-type length. Slightly harder to focus, and for sure harder to find your subject. Again, it's down to practice but it's definitely worth it in the long run.

 

As Diggy suggests, a focus light can help if your camera/lens combination is struggling to find focus. But I'm not sure it would really help with the 45-degree finder or "where the heck is the subject?" issues. As I say, that is just practice.

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My old system was a Canon 7D, and I used the 60mm macro. My new system is a 5Dmk4 with the 100mm for macro. I find no difference in ability to find or focus on my subject (easy on both). I use(d) a 180 degree view finder on both. However, I find that Al Servo works best with the 5D when shooting macro. I never use a focus light and have never though I needed one.

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Thanks all, for your tips! I have the camera set up in the housing and have been practicing out of water- sure is heavier! Haha!

 

Of course, my first day trying the system out was in Cozumel, near shore, with quite a bit of surge...


 

I do have a focus light- an older Sola.

 

I am headed to Philippines (Pura Vida & Amun Ini) in March and hope to have had plenty of topside practice for better success! At least I wont be in heavy current!

Edited by Bdfleischer

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Some techniques/tips:

* Start from farther away so you have a larger sight picture through the viewfinder. Focus, locate your subject, then move in closer and refocus as necessary.

* Take a mental picture of the features around the subject so you know where your subject is relative to whatever you might see.

* If you hand-hold your light, use a wide-beam focus (video) light, so you don't need to fidget with your light to get the beam on the subject.

* Once you have focus established on one subject, take a mental note and start with that distance with your other subjects.

* Superb buoyancy and fine fin control are key. If you practice anything, practice this!

 

I shoot a 5D mk2 and use only the center focus point.

 

Personally I wouldn't bother with topside practice with the housing. It's just too cumbersome, and you're not replicating the conditions/environment underwater.

Edited by inflex
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Some techniques/tips:

* Start from farther away so you have a larger sight picture through the viewfinder. Focus, locate your subject, then move in closer and refocus as necessary.

* Take a mental picture of the features around the subject so you know where your subject is relative to whatever you might see.

* If you hand-hold your light, use a wide-beam focus (video) light, so you don't need to fidget with your light to get the beam on the subject.

* Once you have focus established on one subject, take a mental note and start with that distance with your other subjects.

* Superb buoyancy and fine fin control are key. If you practice anything, practice this!

 

I shoot a 5D mk2 and use only the center focus point.

 

Personally I wouldn't bother with topside practice with the housing. It's just too cumbersome, and you're not replicating the conditions/environment underwater.

 

Great advice! Starting from further away and moving inwards is a great method till you get used to the lens

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