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Hey all!

 

I've just finished a group of video tutorials designed for all levels of u/w photographers to speed up their editing workflow:

 

-> tutorials.brentdurand.com/editing

 

The videos (and companion articles) cover Presets, Collections and Target Collections, Watermarks and more.

 

Are there other topics you'd like covered? Shoot me a DM if so. Thanks, and enjoy!

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I just purchased a subscription to Lightroom so being a complete noob i plan on using some of your tutorials to learn. Thanks!

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Thanks for the complements all!

Joe - I've actually got a 9+ minute tutorial video all about adjusting white balance in Lightroom in my VIP Video Series. It focuses on Lightroom, as I generally leave white balance on auto for still images. Note that these videos are part of a paid series that supplements all the free videos on my YouTube Channel.

-> Correcting White Balance in Lightroom

-> Photo Editing: Humpback Whales in Ambient Light (this covers white balance as part of a specific editing workflow)

 

Enjoy!

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Hi all - I just published a 15 minute tutorial on my YouTube Channel showing editing workflow on an image of humpback whales.

 Hope this is helpful!

 

 

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Thanks for this! Perfect timing as I go through my photos from Tonga (finally). 

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I was quite surprised when you said in your tutorial that you don't like to use Adobe dehaze filter.

I find it very useful, as long as you don't overdo it.

My understanding is that you cannot get the same results with a combination of the other filters, as Dehaze use local adjustments to optimize the image.

While it's interesting to explain how to use the other filters, you should definitely recommend the use of dehaze.

This filter is design to counter the effect of light dispersion in the atmosphere (due to haze).

Underwater light dispersion due to particules is much more of an issue than in air, and the usefulness of this filter is even greater.

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Great feedback Algwyn. Glad you were watching the details. I actually use a bit of Dehaze in my editing workflow, bumping it to 7 in this tutorial image. I absolutely do recommend using it, however in very modest amounts.

Dehaze tends to affect areas of large detail (vs areas of sharp crisp detail like the new Texture slider). I find that if I use too much Dehaze the image takes on a darkly saturated tone, which brings an amateur look to the image. That said, I shoot Canon, and images have bold color from the start. Strobe color temp and camera AWB might also affect how how Dehaze someone feels they need, especially if the color tones are warm.

I've found that some images, like black and white or low contrast, do greatly benefit from cranking the Dehaze slider.

Just my opinions - we all have very different approaches to editing. Thanks again for the feedback - this is how we all learn :- )

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Indeed, as we have different camera set-up, we probably different options in post-processing. 

You probably suffer from the lower dynamic range of the EOS 5D Mark IV vs. the Nikon D7500, which impact the ability to push the details in dark areas. DPReview test is quite useful to see the difference:

1981693214_Screenshot2019-12-12at22_48_41.thumb.png.7f3b85c29604337e9233b38cd9be765b.png

If you compare with the D850, which would be the Nikon equivalent range, the difference is even more significant. You can almost push the D850 to +6EV with an acceptable level of noise.

Dehaze darken the image, which means that you need to push the exposure to compensate. The dynamic range of the camera will impact how much you can do that. It is a camera feature which is often overlooked, but which is quite important for underwater photography, as we have many situations where we need to do post-processing to compensate the issues create by shooting underwater.

During my last trip, we dived with whale sharks water rich in particules, and I would of push Dehaze to +20-40 when processing these images.

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