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echo2600

Nauticam Mini Flasher Trigger (Olympus) Kills Batteries?

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Hello Wetpixel, as stated in the title, my Nauticam mini flash trigger, for Olympus, seems to be killing its batteries in short order. The latest set lasted less than two hours of standby time and about 20 strobe activations before the trigger stopped functioning and the green led indicator on the trigger went dark....

Im just wondering if anyone else has experienced similar? Or, if anyone has any thoughts on the matter.

 

I look forwards to your feedback!

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That is surprising, it is supposed to last like 10,000 flashes. Are you sure you have the batteries in correctly, it is easy to get them wrong (maybe not easy but I have done it wrong at least 2x).

Bill

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Bill, thanks for the input. Definitely got the batteries in correctly. The first two sets seemed to last in the 10,000 flash range. From the third set on, not so much so, the fourth set lasted about 100 trigger events... At first, I thought that it was the batteries, as I had bought some Nuon brand batteries, for rather cheap, from an online retailer. They not only couldnt power the trigger, but failed to keep my old Uwatec Aladin powered up for more than 20 minutes (sometimes, you get what you pay for... Doh!). The trigger is about 15 months old and has, perhaps, 30,000ish trigger event cycles.

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Buyer beware on batteries. Electronics can suffer from something called "infant mortality"; meaning if the electronic device is going to fail related to a defect, it typically happens nearly immediately. Due to you saying that previously your flash trigger worked as expected for a period of time, I would lean towards what you first suspected; crappy batteries. There are so many retailers that sell nearly dead batteries. If you go to a camera store, or an reputable online retailer like backscatter and buy a new battery from them; I think you may find your problem solved with a known reliable battery.

If you have a decent multi-meter, you can also test the voltage of your batteries as well.

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I would suggest only getting name brand batteries and checking them with a multimeter. Assume they are coin batteries, the good ones have a very long shelf life.

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