Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Could anyone recommend a good underwater videography course online, liveaboard or at a resort? I attended one at Lembeh a few years ago, and looking for something else, more advanced. Many thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you bubffm.

I will take your comment as a compliment. Thanks again.

I am following Vanessa's course, and eagerly waiting for more advanced topics.

I feel that I need to fine-tune many things, mostly related to lighting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you bubffm.

I will take your comment as a compliment. Thanks again.

I am following Vanessa's course, and eagerly waiting for more advanced topics.

I feel that I need to fine-tune many things, mostly related to lighting.

What’s specifically the challenge with lighting?

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Could anyone recommend a good underwater videography course online, liveaboard or at a resort? I attended one at Lembeh a few years ago, and looking for something else, more advanced. Many thanks.

I dont think you need any course. Just try to do new things, whatch some videos to get new ideas and shoot as much as you can... Edited by TaxiDiver14
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What’s specifically the challenge with lighting?

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I have very good and powerful video lights (Keldan 8X), and I tend to over-use them. I started to use ambient light filters in combination with a red filter on a lens, and I am getting more pleasant results. I am stragelling a bit with proper positioning of my video lights. Some recommend to put lights in line with the camera, some slightly behind the camera, others - just in front of the camera.

 

Another question I have is about overlap of lights. Some recommend to overlap light cones (so that the subject is illuminated by both lights), but Alex Mustard, for example, recommends to have light cones apart.

 

I am collecting all this information piece by piece, and trying a few different things every time, but it takes more time than I hopped.

I dont think you need any course. Just try to do new things, whatch some videos to get new ideas and shoot as much as you can...

Thank you for your comments, TaxiDriver 14.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

You have good videos. A class could help but I will offer my perspective. I looked through your videos and over time they have gotten better and better. I think if you just keep diving and shooting and as stated before, try new things, you will continue to improve. It appears you do your stuff sporadically as a vacation diver. Which I do as well. It makes it hard because you have limited dives to experiment/correct/experiment/correct. Are there local dive sites and or a local mentor for video you can dive with to continue to hone your skills?

Edited by aviator8
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alex comments on the cone of light overlapping refer to backscatter and the importance of having wide arms

Clearly you do need light on the subject otherwise it’s dark.

From the point of view of the classic 9-3 arm position you need to have them wide enough to have light on they subject and far back enough not to see them in the frame.

In terms of your lighting your videos are frequently clipped on the highlights.

Looks like you swim on the subject keeping the power unchanged and due to inverse square law the intensity goes 4x when you halve the distance resulting in clipping

What I would recommend is that you cut your wide medium and close shots to change camera light settings and position

With this done your basics are covered and you can go on more sophisticated topics

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You have good videos. A class could help but I will offer my perspective. I looked through your videos and over time they have gotten better and better. I think if you just keep diving and shooting and as stated before, try new things, you will continue to improve. It appears you do your stuff sporadically as a vacation diver. Which I do as well. It makes it hard because you have limited dives to experiment/correct/experiment/correct. Are there local dive sites and or a local mentor for video you can dive with to continue to hone your skills?

Thank you for watching my videos, your perspective and recommendations, aviator8.

I live in Canada (Toronto) and I do not like diving in this area. I am trying to make three dive trips each year, and I should definitely use a more systematic approach to improve my skills.

Thanks again

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alex comments on the cone of light overlapping refer to backscatter and the importance of having wide arms

Clearly you do need light on the subject otherwise it’s dark.

From the point of view of the classic 9-3 arm position you need to have them wide enough to have light on they subject and far back enough not to see them in the frame.

In terms of your lighting your videos are frequently clipped on the highlights.

Looks like you swim on the subject keeping the power unchanged and due to inverse square law the intensity goes 4x when you halve the distance resulting in clipping

What I would recommend is that you cut your wide medium and close shots to change camera light settings and position

With this done your basics are covered and you can go on more sophisticated topics

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Thank you for your feedback. You are correct regarding Alex comments, and your guess of how I swim on the subject is correct. I think it would be safer to be stationary while using lights.

Also, would you say that position of video lights for video should be similar to position of strobes for photography? To me, it should not be any different. Could I just follow recommendations for strobes positioning?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for your feedback. You are correct regarding Alex comments, and your guess of how I swim on the subject is correct. I think it would be safer to be stationary while using lights.

Also, would you say that position of video lights for video should be similar to position of strobes for photography? To me, it should not be any different. Could I just follow recommendations for strobes positioning?

Correct tho video lighting is more about no shadows

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Correct tho video lighting is more about no shadows

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Thank you for your comment, Interceptor121.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sponsors

Advertisements



×
×
  • Create New...