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Hi, very simple question. In a photo system, with 2 arms on each side of the camera, and with 2 different lengths, do you put the shorter ones attached to the housing or attached to the strobe?

Personally, I always put the longer arm close to the camera, and the shorter one to the strobe, as in my opinion it gives me more flexibility. However, it seems that most of the photographer do the opposite, but I do not understand why? Is it down to a personal preference?

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Mostly to do with how the rig stands up on land. If you put the longer arm close to the strobe it will stay put if you put the short one will tilt and fall. So generally is housing short long strobe

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Using the longer arm at the strobe usually allows the strobe to stow in a better position when everything is folded up (transport, getting in/out of water etc). The strobes can 'sit' level on the the same surface as the housing with the arms folded inward close to the housing. In your configuration, the arms will have to be folded outward, protruding from the housing, for the strobe to sit on the same surface as the housing. Hope that makes sense.

Not sure how different it is when actually shooting UW, I've not experimented, but I feel having the pivot point between the arms closer to the camera works well.

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45 minutes ago, lbedogni said:

Hi, very simple question. In a photo system, with 2 arms on each side of the camera, and with 2 different lengths, do you put the shorter ones attached to the housing or attached to the strobe?

Personally, I always put the longer arm close to the camera, and the shorter one to the strobe, as in my opinion it gives me more flexibility. However, it seems that most of the photographer do the opposite, but I do not understand why? Is it down to a personal preference?

I'm with you: longest closest to the housing, shortest closest to the strobe. I've done this since Day 1. I have no idea why, but it works and I have never felt the need to change it. Personal preferences....

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agree with the above answers: there is no universal answer

it all depends on the relative size of your housing and strobes.

when you fold the arms, with the strobes as close as possible to the housing, choose the setup of your arms which enables your strobe to rest on the floor. this way your setup is in a stable position, and there is no stress on the arms, no chance for the strobes to fall, etc.

With my housing, as the connection point for the arms is higher than the strobes, I put the shorter arm on the housing.

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As Algwyn just pointed out there is no universal answer and the "best" suggestion is to experiment with what works for you and your rig.

As an example, when I shoot WA my arms are basically the same length, but the ones mounted closest are buoyancy arms, providing lift "centrally" to the rig.When shooting macro, I switch the second section to short arms.

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That was what I was thinking. My question came up since instead the longer to the strobe setup seemed to be the universally accepted configuration. 

 

Now I have 34+26 arms, but I am considering switching to a 26+18 to have more portability, and I should still be able to push the strobes far enough. 

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12 hours ago, lbedogni said:

Now I have 34+26 arms, but I am considering switching to a 26+18 to have more portability, and I should still be able to push the strobes far enough. 

Please tell me those measurements are in cm not inches?  Or am I missing out on the joys of a 10' wingspan?   :-)

I'm curious if anyone has had much success with triple arms?  I've bought enough pieces to do it (bulk buy from China) and I've seen it in some photos of photographers...  but the first time I put it together it seemed very problematic and was rapidly reduced to 2 before I even got near the water.  Wondering if it is something worth exploring again?  Anyone in love with the setup?

Similarly, how well do the extending arms hold up over time?

carbontelescopicarm_m.jpg

 

And, answering the original question, I put mine together both ways and one was obviously much easier to work with given all the bits involved.

Edited by mwalker_mw

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I have used four arms and four strobes and it was a PITA

Sent from my SM-A505FN using Tapatalk

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9 hours ago, mwalker_mw said:

Please tell me those measurements are in cm not inches?  Or am I missing out on the joys of a 10' wingspan?   :-)

I'm curious if anyone has had much success with triple arms?  I've bought enough pieces to do it (bulk buy from China) and I've seen it in some photos of photographers...  but the first time I put it together it seemed very problematic and was rapidly reduced to 2 before I even got near the water.  Wondering if it is something worth exploring again?  Anyone in love with the setup?

Similarly, how well do the extending arms hold up over time?

carbontelescopicarm_m.jpg

 

And, answering the original question, I put mine together both ways and one was obviously much easier to work with given all the bits involved.

Of course cm ;)

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