Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I see the word "Dove" come up all the time on this and other diving forums....ie, "we dove the wreck of the MV UWPhoto" or I only dove with this rig 3 times and it is in excellent shape, hence only 3500 USD or best offer etc

 

In the dictionary I see this ;

noun
noun: dove; plural noun: doves; noun: Dove
  1. 1.
    a stocky seed- or fruit-eating bird with a small head, short legs, and a cooing voice. Doves are generally smaller and more delicate than pigeons, but many kinds have been given both names.
     
  2. 2.
    a person who advocates peaceful or conciliatory policies, especially in foreign affairs.
    "he was the cabinet's leading dove, the only minister to advocate peace talks"
     
  3. 3.
    (in Christian art and poetry) the Holy Spirit (as represented in John 1:32).
     
    So I am wondering how the word "Dove" came into being for diving when it seems no such word exists in the diving context. Is this an American thing or world wide?
     
    Was musing this over morning coffee and wondering. Any thoughts?
     
     
  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That non-word in a diving context is one of my hates. Why can they just say 'I dived there', 'We dived the wreck', 'Only dived 3 times'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

It's like the metric system, America does it differently to the rest of the world.  If you're from America it tends to be dove, anywhere else in the world it is dived:

https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/dived-or-dove-which-is-correct

https://grammarist.com/usage/dove-dived/

 

Edited by Gudge

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

People might be talking about the care products brand (www.dove.com).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe the English language does not adhere to verb conjugation rules as closely as some languages and there are so many exceptions to the rules that one cannot just rely on those rules.  So we rely on practical knowledge.  Or not. 

If it is dive and dived, why is in not ride and rided instead of rode?  If it is eat and ate why is it not sleep and slape?  Walk /walked but not run / runed or runned?

Anyway, "dove" also rolls off the tongue more fluidly than "dived" does, so it gets used a lot.   Generally, I am more interested in hearing about the dive than worrying about the grammar so I don't care much in discussion, and am not distracted by the word, but like to see "dived" in writing..."dove" distracts me when written and I am likely to hear it in my head like "duv" at first...as in the bird.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Yeah I get all that was said here. But it is just such an awkward word to me. I am from the English side of the fence (if you can call Aussies from the English side lol - Well fact is we are, just that we were the riff raff they threw out - or more likely, those who were unfortunate enough to get caught for stealing a loaf of bread to survive, got caught and sent to the other side of the world for it), and to me "DOVE" is so awkward. 

I mean its no big deal, especially in these trying times, but I just wondered were did this come from and is it really a word in this context? - to me its not. Wondered what others thought - that's all.

 

Another strange English word - Chemist - why is it not pronounced "Cheemist" instead of Kemist ? Our friends in the US would know a Chemist as a drug store, others might call it a Pharmacy. In Aus its called a Chemist.

But I do solemnly swear that in Australia we speak the QUEENS English, not all those bastardised versions of it !

Edited by John Doe II
  • Haha 1
  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sponsors

Advertisements



×
×
  • Create New...