Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
clarkedje

What standard?

Recommended Posts

What sort of standard do u/w pics have to be at before a magazine or any kind of publication will accept them?

Dom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It really depends on how big the magazine is going to print the photo. If they are just small photos for editorial use within an article, they can be as small as 1024 x 768 even.

 

For larger spreads, you'd need to talk with the art director. I know one of Eric's 6 megapixel images was used as a 2 page spread - which is as big as it gets in a magazine, eh?

 

Cheers

James

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you talking about standards of quality? Meaning how good do they have to be? Or what is the standard submission size?

 

There is a HUGE difference. And the standards of quality are all over the place.

 

 

Joe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What sort of standard do u/w pics have to be at before a magazine or any kind of publication will accept them?

Dom

 

Dom - The magic number is 300 dpi. Once a file is opened at 300 dpi, 8-bit, an editor will know how large it can be used in a magazine. It would have to be a very special or unusual image for an editor to go through the trouble of interpolating an image up, so assume what you send them in TIF form is all they'll consider. Nor will they be likely to change a layout to accommodate a low resolution image that has to be used small.

 

Any of the 6mp D-SLR cameras should be able to generate files sufficient for up to full page. My new EOS1DsMKII generates 50MB files at 8 bit, so unless they are drastically cropped, they should work just fine for spreads.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the info Stephen. If I'm doing my math correctly, a 6MB camera would not be able to produce a file large enough for a 2 page spread. My fuji S2 produces TIF files from converted RAW images that are 4256 x 2848 = 34.7MB. At 300 dpi that works out to 14.2 x 9.5 inches. Bummer, now I feel inadequate.

 

Do people ever interpolate up before submiting images

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Do people ever interpolate up before summiting images

 

No doubt they do Larry. Not that many images are truly chosen as spreads, but if that is your intent you might as well have the control at the front end to do the uprez yourself via Stair Interpolation or some such "minimally invasive" software.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is also worth considering that art editors like images with large amounts of negative space (so that they can overlay text) and make their magazine look pretty!

 

So if you have an image that runs to black or blue it is pretty easy to make it bigger by cloning in extra negative space. Not only does this make your image larger - but it is also rather ironic that as a photographer you can increase the amount you are going to get paid for an image (related to the size it is used in editorial) by cloning in a load of black or blue on the computer!

 

When I was regularly shooting medium format UW, I was speaking with the photo-library editor who suggested that I shoot all my medium format shots with my subjected relatively small in the middle of the frame so that customers could then choose to crop the image how they needed for their usage (making use of the high resolution of the original). To me this seemed to defeat the point of being a photographer, but I guess it makes the point of how important negative space is for editorial.

 

Alex

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sorry, I should have specified that I meant what quality do pics have to be, and how does one go about getting images published.

Thanks

Dom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The pictures must illustrate the stories/news that the magazine wishes to tell.

Plenty of poor images get published if they tell the story and plenty of great images don't if they are irrelevant. When I say poor - I mean that they are not great photos - they are almost always technically fine (in focus, correctly exposed, well lit etc) - it is just from a purely photographic point of view they show nothing new or interesting. Just same old formulaic pictures. But they illustrate the story and that is what the magazine wants (and pays for).

 

The best way to ensure that your images match the story is to write the story yourself or work with a writer. Look at the type of articles that a magazine publishes - think of an orginal idea consistent with that theme - which you can already illustrate with your images and email the editor. Pitch your idea before you put the work in. At least that way you are not wasting your time if they are not interested. If they are interested they may make suggestions and then it is up to you to write it. If your idea is good then they will usually want it yesterday!

 

Once you start working with a magazine more regularly the process becomes much more organic - with them suggesting articles for you to do, or emailing you for images.

 

Alex

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In case I have answered incorrectly again. If your images are not up to the standard of winning club competitions then go away and work on your techniques. You don't need to be winning international awards. But you do need to be able to shoot frame after frame of technically spot on images.

 

The difference between most amateur and pro submissions is that the pros will provide a wide variety of high quality shots that all illustrate the theme of the article while at the same time providing vertical and horizontal layout options for the art ed. Conversely, while the best shots from the amateur submission may well beat the pros images in a straight themeless photo comp, but they may not be to the theme of the article and probably are not so suitable for editorial layout.

 

Alex

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I concur with Alex. The quality of image is important, but not as important as how that image supports the article or theme. I know underwater photographers who just seem to not get it as to how to shoot good pictures, but they are excellent marketers. By marketing themselves well, they are successful. For me, it's usually in how you market yourself. Ask yourself how many times have you looked in a magazine and said, "my picture is way better than that one?" Then why isn't your's in the magazine? Marketing is the answer. While many underwater photographers often become toilet seat editors, others are making the magazine contacts, starting small and growing a relationship....again, marketing.

 

If you look at some of Steven Frinks pictures, you can see that many spreads he does includes a pretty diver in the picture. If you place your thumb over the diver, you can see what the dive site scenery looks like without all the yellow and blue and pink diver gear. Then the picture loses it's pop. To Alex's point, Steve shoots those kinds of pictures because he knows what the editor will want. Most divers look at the spread and say, "wow, that could be me!" I wanna go there. And the article sold a few dive vacations, increased advertising revenue, etc. Now does Steven Frink have other mind boggling pictures other than pretty divers? Heck yes. He has some awesome stuff, but many times dive destination articles are about promoting a destination that advertises in the magazine.....so they show divers, a few topside shots and maybe one good animal/creature shot. Keep that in mind when you begin your journey. Most magazines today are not like Ocean Realm used to be. They had all kinds of great unusual pictures in their magazine.

 

You can email the editors of most magazines and ask for a listing of issue topics for the next 12 months. They usually have that available. Look over the topics and if you have something you feel can cover the topic, send a query letter. Also, in your query letter, list about 10-20 topics you are prepared to write about (and have photos to support) and often times they will contact you for some work.

 

Again, in the end it is fitting your pictures into magazine content, more than it is getting rare, eye-popping, award winning photos to submit.

 

Joe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Without wanting to go round in circles of agreement. I think Joe is spot on.

 

Taking pictures is easy. Selling them is work.

 

Alex

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

Sponsors

Advertisements



×
×
  • Create New...