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stillviking

Minimum shutter speed to freeze the fish?

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Hey guys,

I'm going to a trip and need the best settings possible because light is not huge there, so I'm going to do (freediving, no flash/oxigen):

- 1/500

- f11

- AUTO ISO

Do you guys think I could go to 1/400 or lower or by your experience 1/500 is the minimum to total freeze the shoots?


Thanks!

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Posted (edited)

Hi, I use from 1/250 to 1/180, with variable  tight f, and get decent fish shots, but I use two strobes. 
Best of luck! Please post your photos with camera details & settings.

Edited by Kraken de Mabini

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I have a lot of experience shooting available light. Minimum shutter speed for a high percentage of sharp shots depends on your focal length as well as how fast you and your subject are moving. Without knowing those things, I can say that 1/500 is a pretty safe starting point. For really fast moving subjects you want it a little higher (1/1000 range), or if you and your subject are static you can go lower (1/250 range).

As for aperture, my experience is that f/11 is too high for many available light shots and will result in poor image quality from ISO being too high. I would recommend starting out around f/8 if you have bright sunlight or f/5.6 in lower light. 

And it's always best to periodically review some images at 100% during the shoot to make sure your settings are giving you sharp, high quality shots while you still have a chance to adjust the settings if they aren't working well.

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1 hour ago, Isaac Szabo said:

I have a lot of experience shooting available light. Minimum shutter speed for a high percentage of sharp shots depends on your focal length as well as how fast you and your subject are moving. Without knowing those things, I can say that 1/500 is a pretty safe starting point. For really fast moving subjects you want it a little higher (1/1000 range), or if you and your subject are static you can go lower (1/250 range).

As for aperture, my experience is that f/11 is too high for many available light shots and will result in poor image quality from ISO being too high. I would recommend starting out around f/8 if you have bright sunlight or f/5.6 in lower light. 

And it's always best to periodically review some images at 100% during the shoot to make sure your settings are giving you sharp, high quality shots while you still have a chance to adjust the settings if they aren't working well.

Thanks Isaac! I will use a 14-35 mm snorkeling with small fish (or with turtles/dolphin if extra luck). I will reduce to f8.

1/500 is good enough or should I go to 1/400 to help ISO too?

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3 hours ago, Kraken de Mabini said:

Hi, I use from 1/250 to 1/180, with variable  tight f, and get decent fish shots, but I use two strobes. 
Best of luck! Please post your photos with camera details & settings.

I will do it, it will be my first experience in a trip!

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19 hours ago, stillviking said:

Thanks Isaac! I will use a 14-35 mm snorkeling with small fish (or with turtles/dolphin if extra luck). I will reduce to f8.

1/500 is good enough or should I go to 1/400 to help ISO too?

Sounds good. I would stay at 1/500 if you have enough light. If you notice the ISO getting too high, you can drop the aperture or shutter speed a little. 

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Totally in accordance with Isaac suggestion, I also revolve around those parameters, adjusting with fish size and speed. I think you'll reach your target with the proposed f8, 1/500, and don't hesitate to decrease speed (ex. 1/400) if you see good sharpness, it will decrease even more ISO and improve your final image. 

Good luck! 

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I would experiment with lower apertures if you have open water in the corners.  If you are at the widest setting you may find you can use slower shutter speeds as well.  It's a combination of how fast the subject is moving and the focal length your shooting at, together with subject distance and steadiness of the camera. 

You can shoot slower shutter speeds if panning and keeping up with the subject.  I used to shoot GP bikes panning with telephoto lenses at 1/250 shutter speeds, that would be a total blur if I wasn't panning.  I know you can't pan as easily underwater, but good technique should help you out on large subjects moving predictably.  It won't help with small darting fish of course.  Think along these lines and adapt the shutter speed you choose to your subject.

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