Jump to content
mattdiver

Slimy thing

Recommended Posts

So, back to the slimy thing... <_<

I think we have eliminated all possibilities except holothurian. Synapta maculata looks too opaque but length is in the right ballpark. There are lots of species options. I would now take this picture directly to a holothuria specialist or an echinoderm website.

--Jon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Worm girl, if you deside that Jon's right and you're wrong about this one being a worm, you may want to abuse your moderator powers and delete this whole thread to keep up the appearance that you know what you are talking about.  :blink:

 

:D Fortunately I have previously stated - and restated many times - that I don't really know what I'm talking about so there are no appearances to keep up! :D But this is too funny.... I checked with two quite knowledgeable worm people, one is whom is revising this family (Jon: I'm referring to Kirk & Sergio) and they both said it was a flabelligerid polychaete. After seeing Jon's pic (which is quite nice) and checking a few other sources I am happy to renounce the error of my prejudiced ways & admit Matt's critter is a Lomanotus vermiformis. Please note that vermiformis means worm shaped!

 

Jon, if you'll pass on Matt's image to Dave P. I'll contact Gordon. Let's see if the two spiny skin people can agree on anything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sure there must be invert experts in the tropical Pacific who can solve this mystery, but for now we seem to have run into a dead-end. Both echinoderm specialists consulted by Worm Girl and myself respectively refuse to claim this transparent "worm." The comment from my holothurian expert: "Jon, normally, I'd claim something like this for the holothurians..but I'm

not sure in this case. The sheer transparency, the lack of any trace of internal organs, and the color pattern (most tropical synaptids have longitudinal, rather than transverse, stripes - but this is no big deal), leave me unconvinced... sorry. Dave." Not an outright rejection but not the ID I would have liked.

I stand by my earlier claim that among all the non-segmented invertebrates I know, only nemerteans and holothurians achieve the dimensions of this critter. And I am totally happy to accept Worm Girl's statement that it is not an annelid or part thereof. Transparency is unknown for benthic nemerteans (and no pelagic ones are more than 50 cm long), but it is known for holothurians. Dave's comment about lack of internal organs is a problem regardless. I still think this is the hind-end of a synaptid (maybe coughed up its guts)... but I am willing to keep hope alive that this is a previously undiscovered phylum :lol: So, get back out there Mat!

--Jon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
but I am willing to keep hope alive that this is a previously undiscovered phylum :D So, get back out there Mat!

--Jon

 

Yeah, all we want you to do is go back out, find it again, lift up the 1 ton rock it's sitting under, collect it (make sure you get the whole thing), preserve it and send it to one of us. Not too much to ask, right? :lol::D

 

Thanks for the original posting. This has been a fun thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fun's the word. Never thought it would stir up this much interest.

 

By the way, when you say preserve, do you mean like pickles? In a jar with vinegar? I'm probably going back there in March, so I'll be looking out for it :lol:

 

Mat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yuck, eating sea worms would be like eating my children..... :lol:

 

While pickling wormy things is probably done somewhere in Asia I really meant as in embalming, with either formalin or alcohol. Baccardi 151 white rum is good!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bringing up some old slime (having nothing to do with eating seaworms)...

Could this alleged but unclaimed holothurian be part of an echiuran proboscis? I'm not much of a diver and have seen few echiuran proboscides (that's geek speak for more than one proboscis:), but I was looking at a pic of a relatively thin, forked and much smaller echiuran proboscis the other day that made me think of this image again, because it was flat and very transparent and had some pigment patterning.

--Jon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oooops, just noticed Wormgirl already suggested this possibility way back :)

Should've known...

--Jon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jon, did you just call my seaworms slimey in a negative and prejudiced manner? I thought you were a nice guy unlike the rest of the phyletic racists out there! :)

 

Doesn't look like any of the echiuran proboscides I've seen but I haven't seen many alive. And that would be one big mother to have that proboscis!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

... if it were green it would look very similar to a echiuran we get. Often the probiscus is extended over a meter and gets very thin and flat (when really stretched it is translucent). Afectionately know as green snot monsters ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So maybe it is an echiuran part after all? Do you or any of your UW cohorts have images? I still think Mattdiver needs to go back & just lift up that 1 ton rock & get the critter for us! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it may not be, but it sure wouldn't be out of place as one :wub: I don't have any pics, never really seemed that photogenic :lol: a nd the local snot monsters are pretty well known ... I'll ask around though :lol:

 

I think we need to set up an Under Water Protocol for web access. That would let us access the critter ID forums from our dive computers ... that way we could post to see if we should be rolling over that ton boulder to find the aft end of a worm :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think we need to set up an Under Water Protocol for web access.  That would let us access the critter ID forums from our dive computers ... that way we could post to see if we should be rolling over that ton boulder to find the aft end of a worm :)

 

No need to check.... you ALWAYS need to roll boulders over if it's a WORM you're after!!!! :lol::wub::lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's been a few months now, so I may not remember this correctly. As far as I can tell, it was a "standalone" animal. It dodn't seem to be a proboscis attached to something else... Besides, as Leslie pointed out, it would probably be very large to have a proboscis of this size...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finally!!! I think I have an answer.... and it's one we already kicked around. It IS the world's largest echiuroid proboscis from something in the family Ikedidae. :) There's only one described species, Ikeda taenioides, from Japan, but specimens that seem to fit in the family have been reported from South Australia so I assume there are others out there as well. Take a look at the "film strip worm" from Port Philip, AU on this page http://users.ncable.net.au/~anewton/others.html

 

The proboscis from some of the South Australia specimens have extended up to 1.5 meters long and they're translucent white with brown markings. Cilia on the proboscis move sand & organic particles down towards the mouth - you can see these clumps in Matt's images.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yoohoo! I think you've nailed it this time. This film-strip worm really looks like what I've seen. :o

 

Thanks Leslie! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yoohoo!  I think you've nailed it this time.  This film-strip worm really looks like what I've seen.  :o

 

Thanks Leslie!  :)

 

About time, eh? Just shows how much I don't know!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sponsors

Advertisements



×
×
  • Create New...